ILWU Labor Negotiations

ILWU Labor Negotiations

 All eyes are on the U.S. West Coast, where negotiations between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association continue despite the expiration of the parties’ current contract. Talks began on May 12 and cover a variety of hot-button issues. For full details, and more information on the tumultuous relationship between dockworkers and the PMA, consult our FAQ.

INFOGRAPHIC: Guide to the ILWU Labor Negotiations

Thumbnail of guide to ILWU negotiations.



Timleline of ILWU-PMA negotiations: 2008 vs. 2014

ILWU-PMA negotiations: 2008 vs. 2014

News & Analysis

17 Jul 2019
Three months after a federal court voided the 2018 results of the International Longshore & Warehouse Union’s election of top officers, the union is still awaiting instructions for holding a new election.
Bill would allow California agency to block port automation
03 Jul 2019
A California bill that would allow a state agency to block port automation comes as the ILWU is challenging plans by APM Terminals to automate a 100-acre portion of the Port of Los Angeles’ Pier 400 facility for refrigerated containers.
30 May 2019
Operations at the Port of Vancouver will resume at 4:30 p.m. local time thanks to a tentative new labor agreement between the BCMEA and ILWU Canada.
29 May 2019
Negotiations have resumed between the British Columbia Maritime Employers Association (BCMEA) and ILWU Canada, but dockworkers at the ports of Vancouver and Prince Rupert could still be locked out at 8 am Thursday morning.
10 May 2019
ILWU Canada voted overwhelmingly to authorize a strike if necessary, but the union and employers have agreed to continuing bargaining until at least the end of May in contract negotiations that have been under way since February 2018.
05 Aug 2017
ILWU three-year contract extension is now official

Commentary

Contract extension talks between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association must address productivity issues in a serious way so US West Coast ports get somewhere remotely close to the efficiency at other major ports in the world. 

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