Gulf Coast

Gulf Coast

A transformation has taken place at U.S. ports along Gulf of Mexico. Those devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 were forced to rebuild. Gulfport’s work is not yet finished. The Great Recession further impacted the region’s economy. The new bigger locks the Panama Canal offer hope for a resurgence of shipping activity along the U.S. Gulf Coast as ports gear up for new trade from Asia. While some ports are building container volumes in north-south trade and on routes to and from Europe, the Mediterranean, Mideast and Africa, others are targeting growth in breakbulk cargoes, and one port — Corpus Christi — is poised to see explosive growth in energy-based exports. With billions of dollars of agriculture products, pharmaceuticals and manufactured goods crossing the U.S. border with Mexico each year, logistics companies and railroads are looking at ways to ease and expand the flow of trade with the U.S.’s southern neighbor. This page includes information about the ports along the U.S. Gulf Coast, the region’s infrastructure projects, its trade and company supply chains.

News & Analysis

13 Aug 2018
Sponsored: Craig Mygatt, Sealand CEO, speaks to Mexico-US trade as well as the impact of polyethylene pl
11 Aug 2018
Sponsored: At the 2018 JOC Gulf Shipping Conference, CAI Logistics Senior Vice President Jason Miller de
28 Jun 2018
Sponsored: Dunavant Global Logistics Group COO Richard McDuffie on US-China tariffs, Gulf resins, infrastructure, and ELD impact on capacity.
16 May 2018
Sponsored: At the 2018 TPM, John Moseley, Port Houston senior director of sales, discuss the potential impact of population growth, resin business expansion, and blockchain viability for the shipping industry. 
09 Mar 2018
Although the International Longshoremen's Association has not had a coastwide strike since 1977, beneficial cargo owners are anxious to have a new agreement in place.
Houston skyline from Port Houston.
01 Mar 2018
Logistec’s previous operations were centered in Canada and on the US East Coast.

Commentary

Vessel capacity remains the overriding concern about whether the Port of Houston will be able to handle the wave of plastic resins exports that will add half a million TEU annually to export volumes within a few years.