SENATE ACTION SEEMS UNCERTAIN ON OMNIBUS TRADE MEASURE

SENATE ACTION SEEMS UNCERTAIN ON OMNIBUS TRADE MEASURE

Whether the Senate will next week send the omnibus trade bill to the White House is uncertain, congressional sources said.

Republican senators could propose a number of amendments to the bill, thereby delaying its clearance, sources suggested.The House of Representatives approved late Wednesday a concurrent resolution that would remove from the bill a provision limiting Alaskan exports of refined oil and requiring that the oil be shipped to Canada through the lower 48 states.

The provision had been challenged as unconstitutional, because of its singling out one state for the export controls.

Moreover, Democratic congressional leaders hoped that removing the provision might persuade Alaska's two Republican senators - Frank Murkowski and Ted Stevens - to vote to override President Reagan's expected veto of the bill.

Administration officials remain confident, however, that even with the Alaskan oil controls provision stripped from the bill, the president's veto would be sustained.

Wednesday's House action, approved 253-159, was on a concurrent resolution supported by both House Speaker James Wright, D-Tex., and Sen. Robert Byrd, D- W.Va.

Sen. Byrd is expected to put the resolution before the Senate next week. If the Senate approves it, the trade bill, absent the Alaskan oil provision, would then go to President Reagan.

Whether Sen. Byrd can win quick action on the resolution, however, appears

uncertain. Senators who oppose the bill, principally because of a provision requiring companies to give advance notice of plant closings and mass layoffs, may obstruct action on the resolution, a Senate aide said.

One tactic may be to offer a number of other amendments to the bill, including elimination of the plant closing provision.

Or if one senator objects to floor action on the resolution, Sen. Byrd would be forced to send the resolution to a Senate committee for consideration there.