MARITIME BRIEFS

MARITIME BRIEFS

PENA TO ADDRESS

MARITIME TRADES PARLEY

WASHINGTON - Transportation Secretary Federico Pena will lead off a list of speakers from the government and the military who will address the biennial convention of the AFL-CIO Maritime Trades Department this week in New York.

Other speakers at the two-day event include Rep. Herbert Bateman, R-Va., chairman of the Merchant Marine Oversight Panel of the House National Security Committee; Vice Admiral William A. Earner, who heads the U.S. Navy's logistics operations; and Maritime Administrator Albert Herberger.

Mr. Pena will speak on Thursday. The other speakers are scheduled for Friday.

The MTD is made up of 40 national and international unions, representing about 8.5 million longshore, maritime and shipyard workers.

The convention takes place Thursday, Oct. 19, and Friday, Oct. 20, in Royal Ballroom A of the Sheraton New York Hotel and Towers, 811 7th Ave., New York. For further information, contact Frank Pecquex at (212) 641-2636.

INDIA APPROVES PLAN

FOR PORT MODERNIZATION

BOMBAY, India - India's Planning Commission Tuesday approved a 32.16- billion-rupee ($945 million) modernization program for the country's major ports by March 1997, the Press Trust of India said.

The investment is necessary to remove bottlenecks which are delaying port operations, Rajasekharan Murthy, minister for surface transport, told journalists in Calcutta.

The ministry had also floated a global tender for undertaking dredging operations at all major Indian ports.

Mr. Murthy said that in response to the tender, two Dutch companies had agreed to offer assistance for dredging operations at the Calcutta and Haldia ports in the eastern state of West Bengal.

OIL SPILL CONTAINED

IN KUWAIT MISHAP

KUWAIT CITY - The 357,600-deadweight-ton tanker Kraka ran into an oil loading hose on a mooring off Kuwait's Mina al-Ahmadi refinery in the Persian Gulf Tuesday, forcing the temporary shutdown of the loading point, a Kuwait Oil Co. official said.

The KOC official said that a spill of crude oil extends for 1 kilometer north of the mooring, but has been contained.

The mooring, which has a capacity to load about 700,000 barrels a day of crude onto ultra-large crude carriers, has been shut down to ensure no further oil leaks.

The official said marine cleaning equipment was headed to the site of the spill but gave no other details.

It is unclear if the Kraka was damaged or how long loading disruptions would continue at the site.

JAPANESE SHIP EXPORTS

FALL; STRONG YEN CITED

TOKYO - Japan's ship exports plunged in the first half of fiscal 1995 as the strong yen seriously hurt price competitiveness, an industry association reported Tuesday.

The Japan Ship Exporters Association said exports for the April-September period totaled 85 ships aggregating 2.49 million gross tons, down 49.7 percent

from the same period last year.

Association officials blamed the strong yen for the fall.

They said exports by archrival South Korea topped Japan's at 104 ships totaling 3.41 million gross tons.

The officials said export contracts based on foreign currencies increased to 60 percent of the total, reflecting the strong yen.

AAPA BACKS CHANGES

IN PASSENGER SHIP ACT

NEW ORLEANS - The American Association of Port Authorities said this week it supports changes in the Passenger Ship Act.

The 1886 law requires that ships carrying passengers between U.S. ports be U.S. flag, U.S. built and manned by U.S. crews.

"The PSA prevents many coastal communities from reaping the substantial economic benefits of a flourishing cruise market," the AAPA said in a statement issued during its annual convention here.

"By opening up the market to foreign flag operators, thousands of U.S. jobs would be created in related industries such as longshore, ship repair, tourism, food service and other types of U.S. jobs," the AAPA said.