MARITIME BRIEFS

MARITIME BRIEFS

PAN AMERICAN BOOSTS

EAST COAST SAILINGSPan American Independent Line is increasing its sailings between the East Coast and South America to a weekly service by eliminating its direct service to the U.S. Gulf.

Concentrating on the East Coast will allow Pan American to put six ships into that service immediately as well as a seventh in the near future, said Owen Kelly, vice president at Norton Lilly International Inc., which represents Pan American. The Gulf will continue to be served through Fernandina Beach, Fla., by a dedicated double-stack train service, he said.

"Basically, we had a fortnightly services in the Gulf," said Mr. Kelly. ''Now we'll have a weekly service."

CARI-FREIGHT SHIPPING

ADDS TO ITS FLEET

MIAMI - Cari-Freight Shipping Co. announced the addition of a new vessel to its fleet, the Cari-Sun.

The ship can carry about 550 20-foot containers, including refrigerated and specialized cargo. It arrived from Germany at the end of September. Originally named Pampero, the ship will work between south Florida and Jamaica, Haiti, Trinidad, Barbados, St. Lucia, and St. Vincent in the Caribbean.

NOVA SCOTIAN COMPANIES

OPPOSE CUTS AT CUSTOMS

PORT HAWKESBURY, Nova Scotia - Businesses here are worried about the idea of losing their Canada Customs office.

Canada Customs said it will take the full-time customs officers out of Port Hawkesbury, New Glasgow, Truro, Shelburne, Liverpool and Lunenburg and will dispatch officers to those places when needed.

But companies like Statia Terminals, which runs an oil-storage facility in Point Tupper near Port Hawkesbury, said that could be bad for business. Statia constantly receives tankers from around the world and the process of reporting their entry will be slowed if the company can't visit the customs officer across town, said manager Paul Crissman.

Losing the customs officer could also be bad news for Stora Forest Industries, which received 50 ocean vessels in 1994, said spokesman Bill MacInnis.