MARITIME BRIEFS

MARITIME BRIEFS

FERRY STUCK ON SANDBANK

FINALLY TOWED TO CALAIS

LILLE, France - A ferry crossing between Britain and France that should have taken just 90 minutes ended Wednesday evening almost 24 hours late.

A team of six tugs succeeded on its second attempt at hauling the British-registered Stena Challenger from a sandbank off the Port of Calais, where it ran aground in high winds and heavy seas Tuesday night.

Rescue service officials said the Swedish-owned vessel - its 172 passengers and 73 British crew all safe - was towed into Calais.

The ferry's captain had decided against evacuating the passengers, mainly British, French, Belgian and German tourists, and crew because of dangerous weather.

A Stena Sealink spokesman said earlier that the passengers were in good spirits. He didn't say whether the ferry's duty-free shop and bars had remained open during the ordeal.

AUSTRALIA'S BHP STEEL

TO OPEN PLANT AT KALAMA

KALAMA, Wash. - The Port of Kalama, a grain and forest products facility on the Columbia River between Seattle and Portland, Ore., will soon be a steel town.

BHP Steel, an Australian company, announced plans to build a $221 million steel-coil finishing plant on a 100-acre industrial site north of the Kalama River.

BHP is a subsidiary of Broken Hill Pty. Co. of Australia. The plant will begin production in late 1996, making coated and finished rolled steel for the building and construction industries. It will provide 230 jobs by mid-1997, officials said.

A big factor in BHP's decision locate in Washington was a recent law that gives manufacturers a break on sales taxes.

The company will save about $14 million in building costs under that program.

WEBB INSTITUTE OK'D

FOR OCEAN TECH PROGRAM

GLEN COVE, N.Y. - Webb Institute, an engineering college with a specialization in ship design engineering, has been given approval by the New York State Board of Regents to begin a master of science program in ocean technology and commerce.

The new graduate program is designed for students with a strong undergraduate background in engineering.

The aim is to extend knowledge into other areas of ocean technology and expose students to the fundamental tools of commerce and business in the maritime industry.

In addition to permanent faculty, there will be lectures by executives and senior managers drawn from various segments of the industry.

Additional information about the program can be obtained from the school at (516) 671-2213.