FLEET EXPANSION INCREASES PRESENCE OF ANZDL IN US-PACIFIC MEAT TRADE

FLEET EXPANSION INCREASES PRESENCE OF ANZDL IN US-PACIFIC MEAT TRADE

The addition of two ships has enhanced the intermodal development of meat exports to the United States by the Australia-New Zealand Direct Line.

The two ships were transferred to the route a month ago by the line's Paris-based owner, Societe Navale Commerciale Delmas Vieljeux group, and renamed for their new service.They are the Direct Falcon, formerly the Helen Delmas, and the Direct Kiwi, formerly the Iram Delmas. Both were built in 1978, and each has a capacity of 920 20-foot containers or their equivalent, including 200 reefers.

Delmas Vieljeux, France's largest privately owned shipping company, acquired Australia-New Zealand Direct Line, or Anzdl, last year.

The two additional ships will make the carrier's intermodal transportation system more available to Australian shippers, especially meat exporters.

Anzdl now has four ships on the Pacific route, providing a 12-day service frequency from Australia and New Zealand to the West Coast of the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Australian meat exporters have been attracted to the Anzdl intermodal service, which allows them extra time to decide whether the cargo is to be moved to the West, the Midwest or the Eastern United States. The decision can be reserved until four days before the ship reaches the U.S. West Coast. About 50 percent of Australia's meat production is exported, and about half of this goes to the United States.

Meat is the biggest export commodity from Australia to North America. The United States is Australia's biggest meat customer.

Within the intermodal service, Australian meat is unloaded at Oakland, Calif., and moved by rail and truck to cold storage facilities in the East and Midwest. Anzdl contracts all U.S. stevedoring, intermodal handling and freight tracking to major U.S. intermodal specialistAmerican President Intermodal.