FINANCING TRADE - GORDON PLATT INTERNATIONAL BANKS PROVIDE MAJOR SHARE OF EXPORT FINANCE

FINANCING TRADE - GORDON PLATT INTERNATIONAL BANKS PROVIDE MAJOR SHARE OF EXPORT FINANCE

An international bank is "frequently in the best position to finance exports of U.S. goods and services to its home country," according to a study by the Institute of International Bankers, New York.

"Indeed, because of its knowledge of markets, economic conditions and buyers in the home country, an international bank will provide export finance in situations where U.S. banks may be less inclined to do so," the study said.Citing data compiled by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, it said that of the $8 billion in bankers' acceptances outstanding at the end of 1992 issued to finance exports, more than 71 percent were issued by U.S. branches and agencies of foreign banks.

The institute is an association of banking organizations operating in the United States with headquarters in more than 55 countries. The study was based on a survey of more than 220 international banks.

Small and medium-sized exporters that are unable to obtain financing from government programs find that U.S. offices of international banks are an alternative source of export finance, it said.

"International banks are also a key source of information and advice for U.S. exporters concerning opportunities for sales in the banks' home countries," it said.

Latin American and Caribbean banks are playing an increasingly important role in financing exports from Florida to Latin America, it said.

EX-IM BANK SUPPORTS COMPUTER SALE

The U.S. Export-Import Bank approved a $39.4 million guarantee supporting the $45 million sale of computer equipment to Czech Savings Bank of the Czech Republic.

Unisys Corp., Blue Bell, Pa., is the exporter and Chemical Bank in Frankfurt, Germany, is the guaranteed lender.

"This transaction reflects Ex-Im Bank's commitment to assisting the export of high technology items to Eastern European countries," said Kenneth D. Brody, Ex-Im Bank chairman. "This is the first of many deals in the Czech Republic."

MOLDOVA GETS IMPORT FINANCING LOAN

The World Bank approved a $60 million loan to Moldova to help the republic of the former Soviet Union to finance imports of "essential" materials and supplies.

This is the second World Bank loan to Moldova. In March, the World Bank approved a $26 million loan for drought relief.

The new loan is designed to finance imports of energy, agricultural materials and health care supplies, the bank said. The 20-year loan also will help provide access to the foreign exchange market for private enterprises.

AFRICAN BANK'S CREDIT TREND MAY TURN

The African Development Bank's credit trend is declining, but is expected to change to stable following the bank's adoption of new financial policies, said Ricardo J. Kleinbaum, analyst at Fitch Investors Service Inc.

The new policies, expected to be approved by year end, are broadly in line with other multilateral development banks and "should improve borrowing countries' incentives to repay loans in a timely fashion," he said.

In addition, recent initiatives such as the formation of a conservative private sector lending unit and the proposed creation of a trade bank, will strengthen the bank's standing in Africa, he said.

The bank operates is "the most difficult region of any development bank," Mr. Kleinbaum said. "It performs a vital role in providing technical assistance and channeling both concessional resources and loans throughout the continent."