ENERGY BRIEFS

ENERGY BRIEFS

EGYPT CUTS OIL PRICES

BY 60 CENTS A BARRELCAIRO, Egypt - Egypt is cutting crude oil export prices by 60 cents a barrel across the board, the Egyptian General Petroleum Corp. announced Wednesday.

The announcement said that the premium Suez blend would sell for $17 a barrel. The medium Balaim and Ras Badran crudes, priced effective March 1, would sell for $16.15 and $15 a barrel respectively, and the heavy Ras Ghareb would sell for $14.70.

This is Egypt's third price cut in a month. On Feb. 15, the corporation announced a cut of 90 cents a barrel across the board. No reason was given for the cut.

FRENCH OIL IMPORTS

DECLINED 2.5 PERCENT IN '89

PARIS - France's oil imports in 1989 totaled 517.9 million barrels, or 1.4 million barrels a day, down 2.5 percent from 1988, said the Comite Professionel du Petrole, an industry group.

France's imports from the Middle East accounted for 43.3 percent of the total, compared with 28.5 percent in 1988. The share of imports from Europe decreased to 23.2 percent.

Saudi Arabia remained France's top supplier in 1989 with 96 million barrels, followed by Norway, which increased its exports to France by 80 percent to 59 million barrels.

After a French boycott of Iranian oil in 1988, Iran became France's third- largest supplier in 1989, with 57 million barrels.

The Soviet Union, which was France's second-largest supplier in 1988, slipped to fifth place with 37 million barrels. The United Kingdom, France's third-largest supplier in 1988, dropped to eighth.

UK MORE THAN TRIPLES

SULLOM VOE OIL EXPORTS

LONDON - Crude oil exports from the UK's largest offshore terminal, Sullom Voe, rose 343 percent to 918,150 tons during the past week from 267,985 tons the previous week, the Shetland Ports and Harbor Authority said Wednesday.

A total of 459,340 tons of crude was shipped to U.K. or other European ports, while 458,810 tons went to North America. Sullom Voe handles about half of the UK's annual crude oil exports.

CLEAN AIR LAW TO CAUSE

JOB LOSSES, GROUP SAYS

WASHINGTON - The Clean Air Working Group has released a report saying at least 200,000 and as many as 750,000 jobs could be lost as a result of the passage of a tougher clean air law this year.

The group, a national coalition of large and small businesses and trade associations, said lower job losses would occur with the enactment of clean air legislation proposed by President Bush, and higher employment losses would follow passage of the more stringent leading Senate bill.

The group argued at a press conference that the two proposals would accomplish largely the same goals, but said the president's bill is more affordable.