TECHNOLOGY BRIEFS

TECHNOLOGY BRIEFS

SHREDDED PLASTIC USED

IN ASPHALT IN WIS.ONEIDA, Wis. - Oneida Indians are experimenting with putting recycled shredded plastic in road-paving asphalt, a new technique from France that is supposed to make road surfaces last longer.

In the last few weeks, it has used the substance on roads near the Oneida Nation Museum.

The substance, known as Starflex, is manufactured by Alloyed Blend Polymers-France, which says it is more flexible than normal asphalt and will better resist cracking and rutting

Tribal managers say that, if it is indeed that durable, the tribe may want to start a plastic-bag recycling plant on the Oneida reservation so that AB Polymers can make Starflex in Wisconsin.

The recycling plant would use low-density plastics, like those found in shopping bags and produce bags, that usually go straight to the landfill.

CHIP MAKER TO GET

ROAD IMPROVEMENTS

BOISE, Idaho - Micron Technology Inc., which has developed a reputation for heavy-handedness in dealings with the state, has agreed to pay half the $10 million bill for a new Interstate 84 interchange near its Boise headquarters.

The deal still faces review by both state regulators and the Federal Highway Administration.

Micron has said for several months it needs a second interchange to alleviate traffic congestion around its Boise complex. That was one reason it chose Utah for a $1.3 billion expansion.

Micron spokesman Kipp Bedard said the company's concern now is to resolve traffic problems in Boise - not plan for future growth.

Micron has doubled its work force in Boise since 1989 to about 5,800 employees, and it is modifying its Boise plant to increase its manufacturing capacity.

US AIRCRAFT FIRMS GET

LARGER SHARE OF ORDERS

WASHINGTON - U.S. civil aircraft orders are on the rise, according to the latest statistics from the Aerospace Industries Association. In the second quarter of 1995, U.S. manufacturers received orders for 79 large commercial jet transports, out of a net total of 119 orders placed worldwide, the association's Aerospace Research Center said. Net orders reflect cancellations and other changes to the announced order backlog.

By contrast, in all of 1994, U.S. manufacturers received 79 orders, out of a net total of 150 orders placed for commercial aircraft.

BOEING GETS CERAMIC DIE

TO MOLD TITANIUM PARTS

SEATTLE - Boeing Co.'s Defense and Space Group has taken delivery of the first ceramic die for forming titanium parts for the F-22 air superiority fighter.

The die is one of six that Pyro Media, a ceramic tooling company, will fabricate for the jet fighter.

Boeing's military airplanes division will use the die to mold titanium vent screens for the nine flight-test and two ground-test F-22s it is building with Lockheed Martin for the U.S. Air Force.