DELTA'S HUB DISPLAYS COMMITMENT TO CARGO

DELTA'S HUB DISPLAYS COMMITMENT TO CARGO

Little wonder Delta Air Lines hails its new Atlanta international cargo building as a primary illustration of its commitment to cargo operations.

The freight business, particularly on the international side, has been very good to the Atlanta-based carrier in recent years."We look at cargo like the popcorn at the movie theater," a significant revenue-generator although most attention is focused on the movie playing at the theater, or the passengers flying onboard the airline, said Bruce Tonn, Delta's system manager-cargo marketing.

The new, automated building will enable Delta's annual Atlanta international cargo volume to climb from last year's 74 million pounds to 163 million pounds in 1993, with 225 million pounds projected for 1995, Mr. Tonn said.

Total 1992 cargo revenues are expected to top $600 million, up from 1991's $476 million. Even more impressive is that while international cargo accounted for only 8 percent of total cargo sales a few years ago, it made up 32 percent of the total in 1991 and is expect to claim a 50 percent share in 1992, Mr. Tonn said.

Delta's overall growth has boosted it into the top spot in U.S. Postal Service revenues among domestic airlines and into the No. 3 position in cargo volume and revenues, behind United Airlines and Northwest Airlines, both of which operate more wide-body aircraft than does Delta, Mr. Tonn said.