Annual Review and Outlook - Maritime

Annual Review and Outlook - Maritime

ARO Commentaries

It’s hard to consider port challenges without first understanding factors influencing container carriers — our
In this industry, price matters.
With longshore labor peace secured, we at the New York Shipping Association will be focused on implementing the provisions of the new six-year East Coast and New York/New Jersey labor agreements, especially those that impact productivity and the competitive position of the Port of New York and New Jersey.
The shipping industry along the east coast of North America is evolving at a tremendous pace.
The Georgia Ports Authority’s central challenge of 2019 is maintaining our high customer service standards in the face of exponential cargo growth.
Challenges are many for the agriculture and forest products exports community.
Ocean carriers need to be transparent with the new formula for bunker fuel so that customers like Eastman Chemical will be able to “buy into” their new way of pricing bunker fuel.
Surcharges will be a critical issue in 2019 because it will alter the entire present cost structure.
Concerns about space, rates, relationships, and contracts are what keep me up at night.
Carriers have been pressed to find innovative solutions in an industry where pricing pressures can dominate the conversation.
Today’s customers are looking for year-over-year performance gains in their suppliers — to simplify the complexity of their global supply chains and dealing with the inefficiencies of multiple providers and handoffs.
With better systems and information, carriers are maturing with an ability to understand customers better and have the means to bring added value to its services.
In 2019, the continued cascading of larger vessels into the US east-west, north-south trade lanes is the challenge ports must cope with or watch the business move elsewhere.
I don’t see dramatic changes to the ocean shipping market coming in 2019, but I do believe the trend toward increased ocean freight rate volatility will continue, and this will contribute to commoditization pressures
2019 will usher in a challenging transition period for international shipping as the long-anticipated International Maritime Organization 0.5 percent sulfur cap in ship fuel will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020.
The tremendous growth that Port Houston has experienced during recent years has been healthy for our region and nation, but we must stay well ahead of future demand, providing the infrastructure necessary to serve the increased levels of commerce ahead.
Keeping pace with the explosive growth of the market right in our own backyard will be among Port Tampa Bay’s top priorities for the coming year.
By offering strong, personal service and adding new vessel string options, Safmarine customers are seeing new markets open and their business grow. This is the winning formula for helping customers succeed in 2019.
As we attempt to ensure our graduates keep up with the changes in technology and regulations, we must not lose sight of the fundamentals of seamanship, navigation, marine engineering, safety, and security that licensed officers are expected to demonstrate.
I look ahead to 2019 with a great deal of optimism about the West Coast waterfront.