William B. Cassidy

Senior editor William B. Cassidy covers trucking for The Journal of Commerce. He is based in Washington, D.C.

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XPO Logistics will not sell its truckload division, but use the former Con-way Truckload to increase its U.S.-Mexico cross-border business.

More from William B. Cassidy

Trucking employers defied transportation hiring trends in January and added 1,500 jobs, putting more truck drivers in trucks.
At a time when LTL shipments and freight volumes in general declined, ODFL increased its fourth-quarter shipment count 8.2 percent, while increasing revenue and profit. Lower fuel surcharges slowed...
ABF Freight, the less-than-truckload arm of ArcBest, laid off more than 200 dock and yard workers as LTL shipments and tonnage dropped in the fourth quarter. ArcBest's asset-light businesses saw...
Lower fuel prices and a softening used truck market constrained fourth-quarter revenue growth at Ryder System, but demand for Ryder’s fleet and supply chain services remained strong.
Shippers using C.H. Robinson Worldwide to move truckload freight saw pricing drop 3 percent on average in the fourth quarter. The logistics operator's volume, net revenue and profit, on the other...
UPS surmounted peak-season challenges to deliver 692 million packages in its busiest season — a 7 percent increase from the previous year. Big Brown said it expects higher revenue, profits and...
The battle to recruit and keep truck drivers is heating up. As driver turnover at large truckload fleets spikes, more and more carriers are offering targeted pay increases.
The JOC Truckload Capacity Index contracted for the first time in eight quarters, reflecting efforts to better match capacity and demand by large carriers, many of which expect capacity to tighten in...
XPO Logistics is moving rapidly to reorganize the less-than-truckload business acquired from Con-way last fall, cutting back-office and management positions while rolling out new technology for...
Landstar System expanded its capacity in the fourth quarter to its highest level yet, 9,500 owner-operated tractor-trailers. A softer freight market meant lower revenue per truckload, however.