Trucking Logistics

For the fourth straight week, JOC.com readers were voracious for LA-LB congestion coverage, but as port woes continue, delays on the West Coast are beginning to trickle down the supply chain. Nine of JOC's top 10 stories for the week concerned port congestion, with the exception one story on the Nicaragua canal.

Spot market dry van truck rates in the U.S. rose in the week that ended Nov. 22 and are more than 9 percent higher than in the same week a year ago, DAT Solutions said.

U.S. shippers, especially retailers, are increasingly nervous and frustrated by supply chain delays and higher transport costs linked to West Coast port congestion, and worried about how that congestion will affect the movement of goods to inland distribution points.

U.S.-Mexico cross-border trucking and rail volume is poised to increase after Mexican factory export production in October hit a five-year high.

A combination of manufacturing migrating from China to its Southeast Asian neighbours and improving road infrastructure is set to grow cross-border trade, despite the import and export of containers taking up to three weeks in some countries.

The value of U.S. trade with Mexico and Canada increased by $7.8 billion in September, exceeding $100 billion for the seventh straight month as manufacturing activity and freight shipping in all three North American Free Trade Agreement partners expanded.

Shippers face another round of woes even after their stalled containers move from congested Los Angeles-Long Beach via intermodal rail to Chicago.

Trailer orders in the U.S. hit an all-time high in October, exceeding the earlier mark by nearly 9 percent, FTR Associates says.

Increasing container dwell times are taking a toll at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, further exacerbating congestion at the busiest U.S. port complex.

U.S. shippers dependent on congested ports face a tough year ahead, FTR Associates says. But that doesn't mean 2015 will be easy — or cheap — for anyone shipping freight in the U.S.