Trucking Logistics

The four companies that control about 95 percent of the chassis at Los Angeles-Long Beach agreed on Thursday to develop a neutral, or gray chassis for the largest port complex in the Americas, with the phased rollout to begin on Feb. 1, 2015.

Celadon Trucking put more drivers on U.S. highways in the last quarter, and those truckers brought back more revenue and profits for the carrier.

Higher rates and better utilization of its terminals, trucks and drivers are helping Con-way Freight, the second-largest less-than-truckload carrier, significantly increase profits.

U.S. shippers are getting their goods pilfered less but when theft does happen, the losses are more severe, according to a recently released FreightWatch International study.

The wave of stronger economic activity that produced freight for truckload and less-than-truckload carriers alike in the third quarter lifted tonnage, shipments and revenue at YRC Worldwide, giving the $4.9 billion LTL company a chance to improve profitability.

Port congestion has gotten so bad in Los Angeles-Long Beach that harbor truckers are imposing congestion surcharges of $50 to as much as $100 an hour, and retailers and other beneficial cargo owners are paying the extra charges if the alternative is that they will not get their containers that day.

Shippers’ hunger to move more loads from the highway to the rails is growing as they see more signs of tightening truck capacity, and resulting higher rates, C.H. Robinson said yesterday.

In an era when most companies seem intent on doing more with less, Old Dominion Freight Line is doing more with more. The fifth-largest U.S. less-than-truckload carrier hired 868 employees in the third quarter alone to keep pace with its rapidly expanding business.

The Federal Maritime Commission has allowed Consolidated Chassis Management, the ocean carrier-owned operator of regional chassis pools, to license its pool management software and provide management services to third-party pools.

Universal Truckload executive vice president and soon-to-be CEO Jeff Rogers spent years running LTL trucking companies, but don't call him an 'LTL guy.'