Agenda

Sun., March 3 | Mon., Mar. 4 | Tues., Mar. 5 | Wed., Mar. 6

SUNDAY, MARCH 3, 2013

2:00 – 8:00 pm
REGISTRATION
Sponsored By:

Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

5:00 – 7:00 pm
HOSPITALITY RECEPTION
Sponsored By:
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Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Seaview Ballroom/Rotunda/Foyer, Lower Level

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MONDAY, MARCH 4, 2013

7:30 am – 5:00 pm
REGISTRATION
Sponsored By:

Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

7:30 – 8:30 am
NETWORKING BREAKFAST
Sponsored By:

Port of Portland logo
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

8:30 – 9:00 am
WELCOMING REMARKS
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Peter Tirschwell, Senior Vice President, The Journal of Commerce (JOC)
Tony Stein, Publisher, The Journal of Commerce (JOC)
The Honorable Bob Foster, Mayor, City of Long Beach
Susan E. Anderson Wise, President, Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners, Port of Long Beach

9:00 – 9:30 am
OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Introduced by Gavin Carter, Executive Vice President, Data, The Journal of Commerce
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Since taking over as CEO of Maersk Line in Jan. 2012, Søren Skou declared and has been unwavering since in insisting on the world's largest container line achieving consistent profitability. While that would seem normal for any CEO, achieving profits in the container industry is easier said than done — yet in the past year Skou has gone beyond mere words. He declined options to build ten 18,000 Triple-E ships, saying the capacity wasn't needed, slashed Asia-Europe capacity, shocked the reefer market by announcing a $1,500, roughly 30% across the board per-container rate increase as of Jan. 1, and declined to sign off on a multi-million dollar investment for new reefer units in 2013. In addition, the parent A.P. Moller – Maersk Group, made it clear in 2012 that a minimum 10 percent ROIC (return on invested capital) is required from its main business units – Maersk Line, APM Terminals, Maersk Oil and Maersk Drilling – in order to justify continued investment. All of that, coming in a year when carriers in the first half defied conventional wisdom by implementing a series of increases – puts Skou at the vanguard of the latest, perhaps most serious attempt by the carrier industry to break free from the boom and bust cycles that have plagued it for years. In his opening TPM keynote address, Skou will present his vision for the industry for 2013 and beyond.

Speaker:
Søren Skou, CEO, Maersk Line

9:30 – 10:45 am
CONTAINER MARKET OUTLOOK IN 2013: WILL CARRIERS SURPRISE THE MARKET AGAIN?
Sponsored By:
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Introduced by John Urban, President, GT Nexus
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

As 2012 came to a close, carriers in the trans-Pacific had seen rates fall steadily since peaking in August, losing roughly 23% during the fall months. A mid-December GRI was unsuccessful and carriers were aiming at a mid-January $600 GRI, with TSA director Brian Conrad calling it "a make or break period for transpacific carriers," given the possibility that weak spot rates could negatively impact 2013 service contract rates, as weak spot rates had done in prior years. The broader picture is similarly challenged. According to Alphaliner, 2012 was by far the most volatile year on record for container rates and it said the "outlook for the container markets remains negative" due to a record 1.7 million TEUs in deliveries currently forecast for 2013 against weaker forecast demand. The question is whether carriers will muster the resolve they showed in the first half of 2012, when they implemeted a series of rate increases that brought most of them into profitability by the 2nd quarter after a loss-plagued 2011. Rate increases later in the year initially caused spot rates to spike only to recede in subsequent weeks. Analysts say that to preserve profitability carriers will need to take aggressive measures to withdraw capacity to create a floor under rates. Whether withdrawals in the Asia-Europe trade by Maersk and other lines will be enough is yet to be determined. This is relevant looking out to 2014 and 2015 when carrier CEOs believe the current decline in ship ordering will bring supply and demand back into balance. This bell weather annual session at TPM will take the temperature of where things stand as of March.

Moderator:
Peter Leach, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Mario Moreno, Economist, The Journal of Commerce
Tan Hua Joo, Executive Consultant, Alphaliner
Johnson Leung, Head of Asia Regional Transportation, Equity Research Analyst, Jeffries Hong Kong Limited


10:45 – 11:15 am
NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

11:15 am – 12:30 pm
MEGA SHIPS: WHO GETS THE BENEFIT?
Sponsored By:
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Introduced by Rodney Oliver, Executive Director (Interim), Virginia Port Authority
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd

In the long, steady process of container ships getting ever larger, 2013 will be a milestone as the year the first of the 18,000 Maersk Triple-E ships are delivered from the shipyard. As ships get bigger, the per-slot cost to the carrier by definition goes down and these basic economics are further enhanced by technical advances in hull, engine, and propeller design and other aspects. The result are a new generation of vessels that deliver tangible benefits to the carriers in terms of lower operating cost and are supportive of strategies such as slow-steaming, yet whose benefits to the customer are less well defined or understood. Ships are a direct extension of shippers' supply chains so there will theoretically be benefit to the extent they are environmentally cleaner and more efficient, but at the same time the sheer magnitude of containers they must on- and offload at one time presents enormous logistical challenges for marine terminals which directly affect shippers' supply chains. Where are carriers, designers and shipyards headed in container ship design, how are terminals dealing with these ships, and what is the effect on shippers' supply chains?

Moderator:
Chris Brooks, Executive Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Richard Smith, Vice President Global Transportation, Sears Holdings
Peter Tang-Jensen, Senior Vice President, ABS
Matthew Leech, Senior Vice President and Managing Director, Americas, DP World
Gene Seroka, President – Americas, APL Limited

12:30 – 2:00 pm
LUNCHEON WITH ADDRESS
Sponsored By:
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Introduced by John Day, Chief Executive Officer, JOC Group Inc.
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom, 3rd Level

Speaker:
Matthew K. Rose, Chairman and CEO, BNSF Railway Company

As one of the two major Western railroads and a significant mover of intermodal cargo, BNSF has a huge stake in the success of West Coast ports as gateways for containerized trade and is thus mindful of the competitive, infrastructure and other challenges the West Coast port range faces. BNSF has invested billions of dollars in track, equipment and lift capacity to link West Coast ports with population centers in the Midwest and eastern half of the country. Its inland logistics hubs in Chicago, Dallas, Kansas City and Memphis have attracted distribution warehouses operated by the nation's largest retailers and logistics providers. As its CEO, Matt Rose will offer BNSF's unique perspective on key developments in U.S. international transportation and logistics as we head into 2013 and beyond.

2:00 – 3:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: REDUCING SUPPLY CHAIN COSTS – WHY THE ROLE OF NVOS AND SHIPPER ASSOCIATIONS CONTINUE TO GROW IN THE TRANS-PACIFIC
Sponsored By:
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Introduced by Mark Laufer, President and CEO, Laufer Group International, Ltd.
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

NVOCCs are holding on to gains won during the financial crisis. In the U.S. NVOs grew their market share from 25 percent in 2006 to 32.7 percent in 2010 and inched up to nearly 33 percent in 2011. Why? Initially NVOs had capacity that shippers were looking for, but fact they held on to their share last year indicates shippers see additional value in working with NVOs. That may change this year as NVOs were hit with rate increases that BCOs didn't see in their direct contacts, but in general the trend is for NVOs in many cases backed by global 3PL organizations to be playing a bigger role in the trans-Pacific market. They bring a combination of technology, cost savings opportunities like sea-air shipping options that appeal to increasingly cost-conscious shippers. Shipper associations are also appealing to many shippers for this same reason. This panel will analyze.

Moderator:
Dan Gardner, President, Trade Facilitators, Inc.

Speakers
Dave Akers, Managing Director, Toy Shippers Association, Inc.
John Abisch, President, Econocaribe Consolidators, Inc.
Paolo Montrone, Senior Vice President, Seafreight – North America, Kuehne + Nagel

2:00 – 3:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: SLOWING EXPORTS – BIG OPPORTUNITIES
Sponsored By:
National Retail Systems
Introduced by Raymond Wisniewski, Jr., Vice President, Supply Chain Management, National Retail Systems
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The numbers say it all: Exports are slowing. JOC/PIERS' current forecast for 2012 U.S. containerized exports calls for only 1.7 percent growth, after actual growth of 8.4 percent in 2010 and 6.5 percent in 2011. In other words, "the debt crisis in Europe and slowing growth in Southeast Asia and the Indian Subcontinent really took their toll on containerized exports," says JOC Economist Mario Moreno. Yet, U.S. exports remain competitive due to a weak dollar, relatively low ocean freight rates and vessel space and equipment for most exporters. What measures are available to shippers to further reduce supply-chain costs, such as the use of so-called "street-turns" in which containers are exchanged directly between importers and exports, to expand access to capacity and reduce equipment repositioning costs? Will ocean carriers in 2103 exercise the same discipline in the westbound Pacific that they did in the Eastbound trade in 2012?

Moderator:
Barry Horowitz, Principal, CMS Consulting Services, LLC

Speakers:
Jeff Coppersmith, President, Coppersmith Global Logistics
Bruce Abbe, President, Midwest Shippers Association
Nicholas Gombos, Vice President, Supply Chain and Logistics, ACX Pacific Northwest, Inc.
Edward Zaninelli, Vice President, Trans-Pacific Westbound Trade, OOCL (USA), Inc.

3:15 – 3:45 pm
NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
Sponsored By:

Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

3:45 – 5:00
CONCURRENT SESSION: INDEX-LINKED CONTRACTS – A REALITY CHECK
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

This year, 2012, was the first that saw meaningful use of index-linked service contracts, or ILCs, in the eastbound trans-Pacific. Simple question, how did it go? What were the lessons learned? What do shippers, carriers and NVOs need to know headed into the 2013 contract cycle? Is there an opportunity for exporters? Some believe those who sign ILCs will be granted more services and capacity versus those who "play the market." If ILCs can be made simple enough, are they an answer to the dreaded spring contract season and can they achieve at least some predictability in costs? Are ILC's the way to not only address concerns over pricing instability, but also a way for carriers to take emotion out of the process and get back to competing on service? Putting ILC's into agreements, potentially means that many shippers can avoid the annual spring ritual and just focus on service, capacity commitments and supply chain excellence. Meanwhile, internal customers at within BCO organizations have a clear line of sight to their costs and can plan more effectively. In other words, there are clear advantages to ILCs but how to put them to use in practice?

Moderator:
Ed Sands, Global Practice Leader, Logistics, Procurian

Speakers:
Brian Bernarding, Director of International Transportation and Customs Compliance, Dick's Sporting Goods
Dave Briggs, Senior Manager, Container Freight Derivatives, TSC Container Freight
Sheila Hewitt, Vice President, International, Transplace

3:45 – 5:00 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: QUANTIFYING VESSEL EMISSIONS TO GAIN VISIBILITY INTO SUPPLY-CHAIN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

What credible methodologies and tools are currently used to gather vessel-by-vessel carrier environmental performance data and, in particular, carbon footprint data? How is such data being used by BCOs to help measure the carbon footprint of their global supply chains? One group, the San Francisco-based Clean Cargo Working Group, each year issues a report on CO2 Emissions by Trade Lane that helps provide credible answers to these questions.  This session will describe the group's methodology and outputs within the context of how such measurements can be beneficially put to use by BCO organizations facing growing pressure to improve the environmental impact of their supply chains.

Moderator:
Bill Mongelluzzo, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Marshall Chase, Manager, Advisory Services, BSR
Sarah Flagg, Global Head of Sustainable Logistics, Damco
Lee Kindberg, Director, Environment and Sustainability, North America Liner Operations,, Maersk Line
Bjorn Vang Jensen, Vice President, Global Logistics, Electrolux

5:00 – 7:00 pm
WELCOME RECEPTION
Sponsored By:

Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom, 3rd Level

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TUESDAY, MARCH 5, 2013

7:30 am – 5:00 pm
REGISTRATION
Sponsored By:

Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

7:30 – 8:30 am
NETWORKING BREAKFAST
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

8:20 - 8:30am
LOG-NET E-Commerce Excellence Award
Sponsored By:

Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

8:30-10:30 am
TURMOIL ON THE WATERFRONT: WHAT LESSONS CAN BE LEARNED FROM THE DIVISIVE ILA CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS ON THE EAST COAST, AND WHAT WILL HAPPEN IN THE 2014 ILWU NEGOTIATIONS ON THE WEST COAST?
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Introduced by David Casey, Director of Business Development, Performance Team
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

ILA President Harold Daggett warned the large crowd at last year's TPM that the 2012 contract negotiations on the East and Gulf coasts would be difficult, but he probably understated his case. Negotiators failed to meet the original Sept. 30 deadline, and the contract was extended twice to early February 2013. Employers in Los Angeles-Long Beach sustained an eight-day strike in late November and early December when ILWU dockworkers honored picket lines set up by office clerical workers. ILWU jurisdictional issues in Longview, Wash., and Portland, Ore. demonstrated that labor relations all along the West Coast are strained. What do those disruptions portend for the 2014 ILWU contract negotiations? What impact will the disruptions on both coasts have on attempts by marine terminals to automate their operations to improve productivity?

Moderator:
Joseph Bonney, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Anthony Scioscia, Senior Vice President, Labor Relations, Maersk Agency U.S.A.
Scott Axelson, Vice President Business Development, TraPac
James Devine, President and CEO, Global Container Terminals USA
Paul Heylman, Partner, Saul Ewing LLP


10:30 – 11:00 am
NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
Sponsored By:

Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom Foyer, 1st Floor

11:00 am – 12:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: MEXICO — THE NEXT LARGEST U.S. TRADING PARTNER?
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom, 1st Floor

As a U.S. trading partner, Mexico is booming. It is now approaching competitiveness with China in terms of wage levels and other elements of landed cost. HSBC recently predicted that by 2018 Mexico would be the largest source of U.S. imports, passing China and Canada. Developing the economy, not the drug war, were the objectives stated by Mexico's new president, Enrique Peña Nieto. The numbers are large and growing: In 2011 was Mexico the 3rd largest U.S. trading partner, its 2nd largest export market and 3rd largest supplier. Imports from Mexico grew 14 percent in 2011 to $263 billion, faster than imports from China. Volumes moving across the U.S.-Mexico border by train and truck has grown nearly 35 percent since 2007, according to U.S. government data. This session will delve into key logistics, transportation and trade issues of relevance to shippers moving goods between the U.S. and Mexico.

Moderator:
William Cassidy, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Dr. Walter Kemmsies, Chief Economist, Moffatt & Nichol
Troy Ryley, Managing Director, Mexico, Transplace
Brian Quinn, Vice President and General Manager, International Business Unit, U.S. Xpress, Inc.

11:00 am – 12:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: HOW WASHINGTON D.C. WILL IMPACT YOUR BOTTOM LINE IN 2013
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The panel of policy experts will explain how decisions made by Congress, Customs and Border Protection, and the Food and Drug Administration will affect how your company moves goods. First, the United States is at a infrastructure crossroad in which Congress and the Obama administration will have to make some tough choices on how the fund highways, bridges and ports. How they fare will impact everything from shippers' transportation costs to how competitive U.S. exports are globally. Second, how the U.S. works to strengthen its ports and inland waterways will play out in the creation of the next Water Resources Development Act, a bill key to authorizing port projects and reforming the Army Corps of Engineers. Meanwhile, Customs and FDA are implementing new policies and programs that will affect how your company brings shipments into the country.

Moderator:
Mark Szakonyi, Associate Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Leslie Blakey, President and Executive Director, Coalition for America's Gateways and Trade Corridors
Kurt Nagle, President and CEO, The American Association of Port Authorities
Susan Kohn Ross, International Trade Attorney, Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp

12:15 – 2:00 pm
NETWORKING LUNCHEON
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom, 3rd Level

2:00 – 3:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: MARINE TERMINAL PRODUCTIVITY IN THE NEW ERA OF AUTOMATION
Sponsored By:
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Introduced by Capt. Nihal Keppetipola, Managing Director, Sri Lanka Ports Authority
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

As ship sizes continue growing, many believe U.S.ports can no longer operate with productivity levels that are far below international standards and still maintain adequate service levels to BCOs and other customers. According to JOC data, average berth productivity at North American Ports for ships of 7,500-10,000 TEUs in 2011 was 75 moves per hour, 24 percent below Northeast Asia, 11 percent below North Europe, and 18 percent below the Middle East. New technology — such as automated guided vehicles and stacking cranes, and dual-hoist cranes that lift two containers at once – is on the drawing boards of some terminal operators in the U.S.However some terminals balk at the investment. When does it make sense for a terminal operator to invest and what capital is required? Which solutions are most appropriate forU.S.ports and what types of automation may be suitable only for high-volume terminals? What level of productivity gains can terminals anticipate when they automate?

Moderator:
Bill Mongelluzzo, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Andrew Penfold, Project Director, Ocean Shipping Consultants
Dr. Felix Kasiske, Partner, HPC Hamburg Port Consulting GmbH
Mark Sisson, Senior Port Planner, AECOM
Edward DeNike, President, SSA Containers

2:00 – 3:15 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: BUNKER FUEL – A NEW ERA FOR VESSEL OPERATORS
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom, 1st Floor

With the IMO's new North American Emissions Control Area now in effect, vessel operating costs have increased noticeably because their ships must burn low-sulfur fuel within 200 miles of the U.S. and Canadian coasts under newly implemented Emission Control Areas or ECAs. How are ocean carriers addressing this issue? How are costs passed along to shippers? Do vessel operators have access to sufficient supplies of low-sulfur fuel at the overseas and U.S. ports where they call? What new tools are available to help the industry to effectively forecast its bunker fuel needs? What are the cost implications of the fuel cost issues for the BCOs that pay the ocean freight?

Moderator:
Mark Szakonyi, Associate Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Bryan Wood-Thomas, Vice President, World Shipping Council
Brian Conrad, Executive Administrator, Transpacific Stabilization Agreement and the Westbound Transpacific Stabilization Agreement
Matt Haber, Senior Advisor, Air Enforcement Division, Office of Enforcement and Compliant Assurance, Environmental Protection Agency

2:00 – 2:35 pm
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CONCURRENT SESSION: REEFER MARKET OVERVIEW: THE GLOBAL OUTLOOK
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Seaview Ballroom, Lower Level

Reefer container shipping continues to encroach on specialized reefer ships, but carriers threaten to cut back on box investments and raise freight rates. This has led some such as Maersk Line to suggest that in five years there could be an acute shortage of reefer equipment worldwide. Philip Damas, Director, Drewry Supply Chain Advisors, will present an update of the firm's 2011/2012 Reefer Shipping Market Review and Forecast.

Moderator:
Peter Tirschwell, Senior Vice President, The Journal of Commerce (JOC)

Speaker:
Philip Damas, Director, Drewry Supply Chain Advisors

2:35 – 3:15 pm
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CONCURRENT SESSION: U.S. REEFER TRADE OVERVIEW
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Seaview Ballroom, Lower Level

Where is the growth in US reefer trade coming from? What are the fastest growing commodities and source countries for imports, and which are driving the greatest opportunities for reefer exports? JOC Economist Mario Moreno will present a detailed analysis of PIERS and other data that point to where the U.S. reefer trade is headed, where growth is coming from, and how shippers, carriers and 3PLs should orienting themselves to take full advantage of these trends.

Moderator:
Peter Tirschwell, Senior Vice President, The Journal of Commerce (JOC)

Speaker:
Mario Moreno, Economist, The Journal of Commerce

3:15 – 3:45 pm
NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom, 1st Floor Foyer

3:45 – 5:00 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: CHASSIS – THE FUTURE IS NOW Sponsored By:
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Introduced by Kevin Higgins, Chief Operating Officer, Chassis Finder
Long Beach Convention Center, Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

After three years of talking about exiting the chassis business, shipping lines, each in their own way, are finally implementing their plans. In doing so they are fulfilling a goal that goes back decades, that is, making theU.S.like all other markets where chassis are provided by the trucker or shipper, not the ocean carrier. But the transition hasn't been easy or pretty. Different models have emerged and sifting through the details can be confusing. What chassis models have developed atU.S.ports? What are the costs for equipment users, and the advantages and disadvantages of each of these models? What ports will experience the next big push for non-carrier chassis operations?

Moderator:
Steven L. Rubin, Principal, InterPro Advisory LLC

Speakers:
Michael Wilson, Senior Vice President of Business Operations, Hamburg Süd North America, Inc.
David W. Manning, President, TCW and Tennessee Express
Joseph P. Ruddy, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Virginia International Terminals, Inc.
J. Christopher Lytle, Executive Director, Port of Long Beach
Marc Winocur, Senior Manager, International Transportation, Target Corporation

3:45 – 5:00 pm
CONCURRENT SESSION: INTERMODAL RAIL – MOTHER LODE OF COST SAVINGS
Long Beach Convention Center, Promenade Ballroom, 1st Floor

The U.S.transportation landscape is being transformed by the conversion of over-the-road freight to intermodal, but increasingly BCOs' logistics strategies are being impacted as well. While intermodal can typically save 15-18 percent versus trucking on domestic routes, many BCOs are looking at intermodal within a broader supply-chain context. For example, they are taking into consideration North American ports of entry and proximity of their distribution centers to the inland railhead, or inland port, whether inDallas,Memphis,Chicago,KansasCity or elsewhere. The clustering of containers at inland ports is providing new opportunities for exporters to gain access to scarce equipment. This panel will explore these opportunities

Moderator:
Curtis Spencer, President, IMS Worldwide, Inc.

Speakers:
Gregory W. Tuthill, Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing, NYK Line (North America) Inc.
Ken Miller, Vice President, Intermodal, JB Hunt Transport, Inc.

3:45 – 4:15 pm
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CONCURRENT SESSION: THE REEFER MARKET IN FLUX: A KEY CARRIER'S PERSPECTIVE
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Seaview Ballroom, Lower Level

Reefer rates are going up, that much is known for sure. The reefer track at TPM 2013 on March 3-6 will take place roughly two months after planned Jan. 1 implementation of an across-the-board, $1,500 or roughly 30% increase in reefer rates worldwide. The dramatic increase was first announced by Maersk Line in September and has since been matched by several other carriers including APL, MSC, Wan Hai and carriers groups such as the Westbound Transpacific Stabilization Agreement. Two months in, it will be possible to assess the impact of the increase on the market and survey the reefer environment overall by the carrier leading the effort, Maersk line.

Speaker:
Bill Duggan, Head of Reefer, Maersk Line North America

4:15 – 4:45 pm
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CONCURRENT SESSION: THE REEFER MARKET IN FLUX: A KEY SHIPPER'S PERSPECTIVE
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Seaview Ballroom, Lower Level

Major reefer shippers face many challenges, among them transshipments that extend transit time, rising freight rates, and having quality equipment made available to them. With the reefer sector becoming more competitive among ocean carriers, these pressures are only growing more intense. Hear from one of the largest global reefer shippers describe how they are confronting these and other challenges they are facing in the current environment.

Speaker:
Fred Cox, Manager of International Logistics, JBS USA

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6, 2013

8:00 – 11:00 am
REGISTRATION
Sponsored By:

Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

8:30 – 9:00 am
NETWORKING COFFEE
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Foyer, Third Level

9:00 – 10:15 am
CONCURRENT SESSION: UNDERSTANDING FORWARD FREIGHT AGREEMENTS (FFA'S) IN THE CONTAINER INDUSTRY: A WORKSHOP
Sponsored By:

Introduced by Peter Tirschwell, Senior Vice President, The Journal of Commerce
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom D-H, Third Level

A discussion on Container FFA's as a tool for protecting against adverse movement in freight rates. With volatility in container rates only growing, container FFA's, a financial contract or simply a derivative, offer shippers, carriers and 3PLs the opportunity to hedge against adverse swings in rates. Until FFA's became available in the container sector, there was no way for a shipper, carrier or 3PL to protect itself against container freight rate volatility. The use of similar financial instruments has been common practice for decades in oil, bulk and other commodity markets. This workshop will explain derivatives, how they work and how you can put them to work in taking uncertainty out of your ocean freight costs.

The workshop will focus on these and other areas:

  • Terms, Terminology and Expressions used in the financial markets
  • Functionality of an FFA used as a hedge
  • Review of what an indexed contract has to look like so it's really floating and will correspond with an FFA contract
  • How market fundamentals and basis risks affect the physical market
  • Available research tools and data that hedging decisions can be based on
  • Corporate implementation / Do's and Don'ts. / Lessons learned
  • Stage of the Container FFA market. References, volumes, activity, trends etc.



Speaker:
Kai Miller
, Head of  Business Development, Container Derivatives, ICAP Plc

9:30 – 10:15 am
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CONCURRENT SESSION: REGULATIONS — AN OVERVIEW OF THE LATEST GOVERNMENT REGULATIONS AFFECTING US REEFER IMPORTS AND EXPORTS
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom A-C, Third Level

Moderator:
Bill Mongelluzzo, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speaker:
Lynnette Keffer, CEO, J & K Fresh, LLC

10:15 – 10:45 am
NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Foyer, Third Level

10:45 – 12:00 PM
THE JAPAN 24-HOUR RULE AND OTHER RECENT CARGO SECURITY DEVELOPMENTS: A WORKSHOP
Introduced by Peter Tirschwell, Senior Vice President, The Journal of Commerce
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom D-H, Third Level

The new Japan 24-hour rule takes effect in 2014, meaning that manifests for container vessels headed to Japan will need to be in the hands of the government 24-hours before the ship sails, similar to the U.S. 24-hour rule implemented shortly after the 9-11 attacks. This will be the first time that U.S. NVOs, forwarders, carriers and shippers will be impacted by a 24-hour rule-type regulation for cargo leaving the U.S. Companies will thus have to have documents ready 24-hours before cargo load-out. Bryn Heimbeck, CEO of Trade Tech, will provide an update on this rule and other developments in cargo security regulations, which to date have largely affected only containerized cargo entering the U.S. but now are being extended to cargo entering other countries that may impact U.S. exporters and multinational shippers.

Speaker:
Bryn Heimbeck, Co-Founder and President, Trade Tech
Dan Herbert, Vice President, Trade Tech

10:45 – 12:00 pm
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US-CHINA AGRICULTURAL TRADE, COMMODITIES AND POLICIES, U.S. REEFER EXPORTS
Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom A-C, Third Level

Moderator:
Bill Mongelluzzo, Senior Editor, The Journal of Commerce

Speakers:
Mr Hang Tian, Deputy General Manager, China Merchants Holdings Inc.
Chris Logan, Senior Director, Trade Development, Georgia Ports Authority

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