West Coast Ports

Productivity is the name of the game for West Coast ports leading up to the expansion of the Panama Canal in 2015. Unlike many of the ports on the East and Gulf coasts that are deepening their harbors and enlarging their marine terminals to prepare for the mega-ships that will begin transiting the canal in 2015, the major West Coast gateways already have 50-foot harbors and terminals of 100 to more than 400 acres in size.

In order to prevent an erosion of market share to East Coast ports, the Seattle-Tacoma, Oakland and Los Angeles-Long Beach gateways must improve their efficiency in unloading vessels, moving containers through the yards and expediting the departure of containers by truck and intermodal rail.

The 25 to 26 container moves per crane per hour that mark West Coast port operations must be increased to at least 30 moves per hour. Terminal operators are exploring options for automating yard, gate and on-dock rail operations. The busiest terminals will invest in costly equipment such as dual-hoist cranes, automated guided vehicles and automated stacking cranes. The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which together handle about 40 percent of U.S. imports from Asia, will spend more than $7 billion in the coming decade on larger, more efficient terminals and improved connectivity to rail and highway networks.

Offering a transit time advantage of a week to 10 days to the U.S. interior, and the potential for reducing per-slot vessel costs by hundreds of dollars with the arrival of vessels having a capacity of 13,000-TEU capacity, West Coast ports want to beat the canal by even further expanding their 70 percent market share of U.S. imports from Asia.

 

News & Analysis

An agreement to extend contracts early from the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and International Longshoremen’s Association would usher in an unprecedented era of labor peace at US ports.
27 Sep 2016
The International Longshore and Warehouse Union and Pacific Maritime Association on Tuesday raised shippers’ hopes for a longer period of labor peace at US West Coast ports.
Container volumes at West Coast ports, including the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, pictured, peaked in 2007.
05 Sep 2016
Containerized imports moving through the West Coast in July continued the recent trend of modest growth.
05 Sep 2016
California’s congressional delegation, joined by Federal Maritime Commission Chairman Mario Cordero and labor leaders, urged the federal government Sunday to assist in releasing cargo from Hanjin Shipping vessels.
03 Sep 2016
Details are emerging on how much US ports and marine terminals are charging shippers to release stranded Hanjin Shipping containers.
Ships at berth at the Port of Long Beach, such as the one pictured, are able to plug into shore-supplied power, which is known as cold-ironing, as part of the port's pollution reduction efforts.
25 Aug 2016
The congestion that crippled West Coast ports in 2015 temporarily derailed the progress in reducing pollution at the Port of Long Beach.
Two different parts of the federal government, the Commerce Department and Department of Transportation, are looking into the issue of productivity at U.S. ports.
24 Aug 2016
The U.S. federal government, with the help of shippers and others, is trying to come to grips with how to improve port productivity.

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