West Coast Labor Disputes

Relations between members of the International Longshoremen and Warehouse Union and waterfront employers on the U.S. West Coast have heated up over the past couple years, with protests and other actions in the Pacific Northwest and at ports in California.

The two parties are currently in negotiations for a new contract to replace the one slated to expire on June 30, 2014. For our continuing coverage of the negotiations, visit our ILWU Labor Negotiations page.

Special Coverage

Negotiations are underway for a new contract between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and employers represented by the Pacific Maritime Association. This JOC resource provides answers to common questions regarding the negotiations and their potential impact.

News & Analysis

04 May 2015
Seattle and Tacoma took a big hit in the first quarter as its market share among Canadian Pacific Northwest ports took a dive amid longshore labor disruption.
McEllrath encouraging rank and file to stay strong, 2-12-15
12 Feb 2015
The president of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union recorded a video message urging members to support ILWU contract negotiators and ignore “bullshit” from the Pacific Maritime Association.
11 Feb 2015
Demand for extra ships tied to the U.S. West Coast longshore labor showdown is driving up charter rates for certain classes of container ships.
Port of Portland, Oregon
10 Feb 2015
Hanjin Shipping Co. said Wednesday in Asia that it was withdrawing direct service to the Port of Portland, Oregon, after a 2 1/2-year-old dispute with longshoremen that severely undermined productivity.
09 Feb 2015
Loaded imports through the Los Angeles-Long Beach port complex fell by a quarter last month compared to the same period a year ago, reflecting the severity of pain congestion has inflicted on the largest container gateway in the Americas.
06 Feb 2015
Some 40 container ships were anchored at ports up and down the West Coast on Friday, promising more delays into next week and well beyond that after the Pacific Maritime Association announced on Friday that terminals won’t handle vessels over the weekend in an effort to clear backlogs.

Commentary

With the expanded Panama Canal set to open in a year and shippers frustrated with West Coast delays, Florida is pitching itself as an international container import gateway. But the Sunshine State faces fierce competition from Southeast rivals.

More Commentary