West Coast Labor Disputes

West Coast Labor Disputes

Relations between members of the International Longshoremen and Warehouse Union and waterfront employers on the U.S. West Coast have heated up over the past couple years, with protests and other actions in the Pacific Northwest and at ports in California.

The two parties are currently in negotiations for a new contract to replace the one slated to expire on June 30, 2014. For our continuing coverage of the negotiations, visit our ILWU Labor Negotiations page.

Special Coverage

Negotiations are underway for a new contract between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and employers represented by the Pacific Maritime Association. This JOC resource provides answers to common questions regarding the negotiations and their potential impact.

News & Analysis

Chicago business
27 Feb 2015
A broad measure of business activity for the Chicago are plunged in February with much of the blame being laid at the door of the West Coast port labor standoff.
25 Feb 2015
Rep. Janice Hahn, D-Calif., urged the Federal Maritime Commission to investigate the Pacific Maritime Association’s “unilateral” curtailing of night, weekends and holiday hiring of dockworkers during recent West Coast longshore contract negotiations.
25 Feb 2015
North American intermodal volumes plummeted as U.S. West Coast port congestion came to a head last week before union and waterfront officials at last brokered a deal Friday evening.
24 Feb 2015
Most West Coast ports were bustling with activity this week as marine terminals order full vessel, yard and gate work crews, and International Longshore and Warehouse Union dispatch halls are filling all of the orders.
Hyundai container ship at Port of Oakland
22 Feb 2015
The grievance machinery in the International Longshore and Warehouse Union contract was back in effect only 24 hours when the area arbitrator in Oakland on Sunday ruled that members of ILWU Local 10 had engaged in an illegal work stoppage.
busy Oakland port, November 2014
21 Feb 2015
The tentative coastwide contract agreement that was reached Friday evening by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association, while most welcome, is just the beginning of a long process West Coast ports must endure to recover from the backlog of containers and vessels that have overwhelmed their operations the past four months, and to restore their reputation among shippers.

Commentary

The Feb. 20 tentative agreement between the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association brought a measure of labor peace to the U.S. West Coast waterfront. But after nine months of negotiations marked by labor slowdowns, threats of a lockout and the worst congestion in more than a decade, the scars will be raw for some time.

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