Port Productivity


About the JOC Port Productivity Rankings

Within any prevailing trend, there will always be winners and losers. By ranking ports and terminals in terms of berth productivity, the JOC aims to shine a light on efficiency, and perhaps be a catalyst to improving it.

In the past, we’ve published straight productivity rankings — that is, the top ports and terminals by region and broken down by vessel size. Those rankings did not consider call size — the number of containers moving by ship per call — and thus, in a sense, did not give a complete picture of productivity. Nor did they reasonably allow for ports or terminals outside the top 10 in port productivity to make the rankings, resulting in an overly predictable list year after year. 

So this year, we analyzed which terminals made the greatest strides in port efficiency from 2014 to 2015. It is, by definition, difficult for a high-performing terminal to make these lists, so for those accustomed to appearing at the top, understand that your performance is no less worthy.

For this year’s rankings, we’ve also broken the world down into nine regions, separating Africa and Europe, and Latin America and North America, which previously had been grouped together.  

Starting with berth productivity — the average number of container moves per crane, per hour while a ship is at berth — we’ve measured relative improvement. We then weighted those productivity numbers by call size to achieve actual improvement in year-over-year performance, the measurement by which the rankings have been listed. 

To qualify, a terminal must have improved actual and relative (unweighted) productivity, and processed more than 100 ship calls in 2015 and a minimum of 50 in 2014. 

For more information on purchasing the underlying data or to  learn more about our Port Productivity Subscription Report, which provides in-depth industry market analysis, visit  www.joc.com/port_productivity.

 

News & Analysis

26 Sep 2016
Terminals at Jawaharlal Nehru Port Trust, India’s biggest container gateway, have come under fire from customs authorities for collecting “unauthorized” charges from shippers.
The Hugh K. Leatherman terminal at the Port of Charleston, pictured under construction, will increase the port's overall capacity by 50 percent upon completion.
13 Sep 2016
The Port of Charleston and the state of South Carolina over the next decade will spend a combined $2.2 billion to handle New Panamax ships.
13 Sep 2016
India’s top port is continuing to work intensely to improve productivity after a tumultuous 2015.
09 Sep 2016
The Port of Houston Authority is exploring the possible use of an innovative technology that would move containers to and from port terminals.
Although traffic at the Port of New York and New Jersey, pictured, declined year-over-year in July, it was still the highest monthly figure to date in 2016.
08 Sep 2016
The volume of loaded containers imported through the Port of New York and New Jersey fell in July for the fifth consecutive month.
06 Sep 2016
Chennai Port, India’s second-busiest public container handler, will need to put in mighty efforts to retrieve some of the cargo lost to nearby private rivals.

Commentary

Productivity data, when done right, can improve cargo visibility, availability and velocity.

More Commentary

Video

Clearmetal Founder and Chief Executive Officer Adam Compain got together with JOC Senior Content Editor Alessandra Barrett at the 16th TPM Conference to chat about the largest challenges facing ocean carriers when it comes to equipment positioning and repositioning and the hurdles created in this regard by the ever-growing complexity of supply chains.