Port Productivity

Port Productivity


About the JOC Port Productivity Rankings

The rankings included in this report are based on seven elements provided by ocean carriers representing more than 75 percent of global capacity. Those data points are: vessel name, terminal name, port city, port country, berth arrival, berth departure and number of moves (including lift-ons, lift-offs and re-stows).

Berth arrival and departure refer to “lines down” and “lines up” — that is, the actual arrival and departure of the ship at berth. The calculation of moves per hour between these two times is referred to as unadjusted gross berth productivity.

It’s the same calculation for all 483 ports and 771 terminals JOC Group Inc. evaluates, allowing for basic apples-to-apples comparison globally. The data enters a data warehouse in standardized format so that it’s accessible for reports, rankings, analysis and other uses.

Interaction with global carriers resulted in data whose definitions are consistent across all carriers. Rankings were determined by analyzing more than 150,000 port calls in 2013.

Productivity is defined as the average of the gross moves per hour for each call recorded last year. Gross moves per hour for a single vessel call is defined as the total container moves (onload, offload and repositioning) divided by the number of hours for which the vessel is at berth.

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Special Coverage

Port productivity data from JOC Group Inc. for 2013 demonstrate that terminal operators around the world are taking quite seriously the challenge they face to service vessels in port as quickly and efficiently as possible in this era of mega-ships.

News & Analysis

30 Oct 2014
Hapag-Lloyd again raised its “on-carriage congestion surcharge” for import shipments handled at Jawaharlal Nehru Port (Nhava Sheva), indicating that India’s largest container handler is still battling clogged railyards and that equipment turn times for ocean carriers have yet to improve.
 Kansas City Southern Railway
24 Oct 2014
Kansas City Southern Railway is talking with ocean carriers and beneficial cargo owners about diverting shipments bound for the U.S. Gulf region away from congestion-wracked Los Angeles-Long Beach to the Port of Lazaro Cardenas in south-central Mexico.
The Cat Lai Terminal within the port of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
19 Oct 2014
Severe port congestion at the Philippines’ port of Manila in recent months resulted in average vessel delays of more than five days, according to a recent report from CargoSmart.
18 Oct 2014
Truckers or cargo interests who contend that terminal operators have unlawfully billed them for late retrieval of containers while the ports were congested have the right to file a complaint with the Federal Maritime Commission, according to a commission staff member.
17 Oct 2014
The Port of Long Beach is temporarily giving container cargo owners three extra days of free time to keep import containers on the docks.
17 Oct 2014
Congestion-caused delays at the largest U.S. port complex are pushing up outbound spot market truck rates from the Los Angeles-Long Beach market to inland distribution points.

Commentary

Port congestion causes delays and increases transportation costs that hurt our economy. Resolving the consequences of congestion is especially important to keep pace with the growth in international maritime trade.

Video

JOC Group Inc. has aggregated, standardized and validated port productivity data for 483 ports and 771 terminals worldwide, with data provided by 17 prominent worldwide carriers. This unique data set can help you benchmark your productivity by port, terminal, ship size range, and call size range, identify issues with berth turn-around times, analyze performance and trends over time and much more!
Dr. Noel Hacegaba, deputy executive director, Port of Long Beach, discusses port productivity and the impact of mega-ships, the role of infrastructure investment, and the need to emphasize system improvements to increase efficiency.
Global Terminal is undergoing major expansion while continuing cargo operations. Guy Buzzoni, vice president of infrastructure development at Global Terminal, discusses the challenges -- and explains why he's watching the weather.