Port Productivity

Port Productivity


About the JOC Port Productivity Rankings

Here are the JOC Port Productivity rankings for 2014.

The rankings included in this report are based on seven elements provided by ocean carriers representing more than 75 percent of global capacity. Those data points are: vessel name, terminal name, port city, port country, berth arrival, berth departure and number of moves (including lift-ons, lift-offs and re-stows).

Berth arrival and departure refer to lines down and lines up — that is, the actual arrival and departure of the ship at berth. The calculation of moves per hour between these two times is referred to as unadjusted gross berth productivity.

It’s the same calculation for all 483 terminals and 771 ports the JOC evaluates, allowing for basic apples-to-apples comparison globally. The data enters a data warehouse in standardized format so that it’s accessible for reports, rankings, analysis and other uses.

Interaction with global carriers resulted in data whose definitions are consistent across all carriers. Rankings were determined by analyzing more than 125,000 port calls in 2014.

Productivity is defined as the average of the gross moves per hour for each call recorded in 2014. Gross moves per hour for a single vessel call is defined as the container moves (onload, offload and repositioning) divided by the number of hours the vessel is at berth.

For more information on purchasing the underlying data or to  learn more about our Port Productivity Subscription Report, which provides in-depth industry market analysis, visit  www.joc.com/port_productivity.

 

Special Coverage

The 19,224-TEU MSC Oscar sails in the Asia-Europe trade and is too big to call at U.S. ports. Photo credit: ptnphoto / Shutterstock.com
Increasingly larger container ships are improving vessel-at-berth productivity at ports around the world, according to an analysis of the latest JOC Port Productivity data.

News & Analysis

01 Jul 2015
The arrival of mega-ships is having a profound effect on port operations at all major U.S. gateways, but the biggest impact by far in terms of congestion is being felt in the two largest port complexes, Los Angeles-Long Beach and New York-New Jersey.
27 Jun 2015
U.S. agriculture shouldn’t expect dramatic improvements in cargo-handling productivity to come out of the new West Coast longshore contract, said Ed DeNike, chief operating officer at SSA Marine, said the contract itself will not deliver productivity.
22 Jun 2015
Analysis of more than 125,000 port calls in 2014 ranked six ports in China and two ports from the United Arab Emirates among the Top 10 for the year.
19 Jun 2015
Critics of the five-year contract ratified in May by the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association say the benefits were weighted heavily in favor of the union, but PMA President Jim McKenna says that wasn’t the case at all.
16 Jun 2015
The Port of Rotterdam continues to position itself as a pre-eminent European port of call for mega-ships with the arrival of three new cranes at the ECT Delta Terminal at Maasvlakte.
container stacks in Long Beach
22 May 2015
Now that the West Coast’s labor problems are behind them, longshoremen and employers must focus on the real chokepoint in marine terminal operations — the container yard, the president of the largest International Longshore and Warehouse Union local said Thursday.

Commentary

Meeting in Asia this month with a number of carriers that participate in the project by submitting their berth productivity data to The Journal of Commerce, I’ve never seen a greater sense of urgency to find ways to get ships in and out of port faster. It’s a simple calculus: The quicker a ship leaves port, the slower the speed and less fuel is needed to get to the next port on schedule.

Video

Chris Mazza, Vice President and Chief Customer Officer of Xvela, discusses the relevancy of cloud-based solutions for mar
Special Projects Editor Alessandra Barrett discusses the recent JOC Port Productivity awards with winners South Carolina
With productivity up 20% year-over-year at Conley Container Terminal, Port of Boston's Deputy Port Directors Mike Meyran,