NAFTA Trade

When the U.S., Canada and Mexico implemented the North American Free Trade Agreement in 1994, it opened the door for open trade by ending tariffs on various goods and services and creating an even playing field for the three markets. Today, agricultural goods such as eggs, corn and meats; manufactured products such as auto parts; and raw materials such as steel and lumber flow freely across the borders, primarily by truck and rail.

The U.S. exported more than $280 billion in goods to Canada in 2011, making its northern neighbor the largest source for outgoing products.  U.S. imports, at more than $315 billion, make Canada the second-largest source of inbound goods after China.

Exports to and imports from Mexico set record highs in 2011, with exports reaching $198.4 billion and imports hitting $262.9 billion.

The combined $1.1 trillion in combined trade among the three partners make NAFTA the second-largest trade bloc in the world, second only to the 27-member European Union.

News & Analysis

27 Jul 2017
Mexican trucking companies are urging lawmakers to stiffen penalties against cargo robberies.
10 Nov 2016
It’s far from clear how Donald Trump’s fiery anti-trade deal rhetoric on the campaign trail will translate into his actions as president and their impact on trade, according to an analysis by IHS Markit, parent of JOC.com.
03 Oct 2016
Mexican shippers and railroads are closely watching to see if a new regulatory agency will lower rates and how it will weigh in on disagreements between carriers and customers, as intermodal volume growth sputters.
02 Aug 2016
Dicom looks to integrate cross-border trucking, parcel business with last-mile service as e-commerce grows.
27 Jul 2016
Linea Peninsular has added a weekly container service to Port Tampa Bay.
25 Jul 2016
TransForce's package division increased sales 6 percent, but its trucking business struggled in the second quarter.

Commentary

controversial program Mexico installed on Jan. 1 that raises fuel prices by up to 20 percent soon will trickle down to trucking operators and ultimately to the automotive, white goods, and other manufacturers and suppliers surging into Mexico.