Mega-Ships

Mega-Ships

Seeking efficiency and economies of scale, the world’s container carriers are increasingly ordering mega-ships capable of handling more than 8,000 20-foot-equivalent container units, with even larger vessels appearing particularly on the Asia-Europe trade lane. Shippers and carriers looking to reach the North American east coast with these post-Panamax ships must transit the Suez Canal because, as their name implies, they are too big to sail through the Panama Canal. But with Panama’s decade-long canal expansion project set for completion in 2015, many larger vessels will be able to add the Panama Canal to their route options. Ports around the world are preparing for the onslaught of these mega-ships, dredging harbors and investing in super-post-Panamax cranes that can reach across 22 or more rows of containers to expedite loading and unloading operations.

Special Coverage

But the ports should recoup much of their lost market share next year and beyond if they address their congestion and labor problems, speakers at the Port of Long Beach Pulse of the Ports breakfast said Wednesday.

News & Analysis

02 May 2015
APM Terminals in Rotterdam officially opened the container terminal of the future on April 24 with the aggressive prediction that Maasvlakte II will improve vessel productivity by 40 percent.
01 May 2015
Europe's largest inland port to grow as ultra-large container ships arrive at north European ports.
28 Apr 2015
By most standards, congestion at the largest U.S. port complex is significantly less than it was during the winter, long truck turn times persist.
Maersk container ship
28 Apr 2015
Mega-vessels deployed in the Asia-Europe trade are overlapping intra-Asia routes and compounding the influx of capacity cascading into the regional trade from oversupplied east-west routes.
CMA CGM container ship
30 Mar 2015
CMA CGM will sign an order for three 20,600-TEU container ships this week, the French carrier’s vice chairman said.
24 Mar 2015
Ports must embrace revolutionary changes in handling containers to meet carriers’ productivity demands for their large vessels, according to Drewry Maritime Research.

Commentary

Ports need a clear vision of trade developments, equipment and staffing issues, and hinterland infrastructure in their communities.

Video

Acting Long Beach Port Director Al Moro talks about the ambitious projects to prepare the port for the big new container ships that are calling there. POLB and private investors are providing billions of dollars to build new rail lines and a huge automated container terminal, as well as to replace the Gerald Desmond Bridge, which is too low for the new ships.