East Coast Ports

In-depth news, analysis and statistical information of U.S. East Coast ports such as the Port of New York and New Jersey and the Port of Savannah. Dockworkers on the U.S. East Coast are represented by the International Longshoremen's Association. East Coast ports have spent the last several years preparing for the opening of the new locks of the Panama Canal, which handled their first commercial transit on June 26, 2016. Industry observers are now watching closely to see if East Coast ports begin to capture a larger share of imports from Asia, which the West Coast has traditionally dominated.

Special Coverage

Both sides say they're still interested in an early deal, but talk of a 10-year contract has cooled.

News & Analysis

29 Nov 2016
The International Longshoremen’s Association and its employers have scheduled “informal meetings on collective bargaining issues.”
23 Apr 2014
A Baltimore jury will hear dueling assault complaints stemming from a fight between two International Longshoremen’s Association officials whose local union is in a contract negotiations standoff with port employers.
18 Apr 2014
Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said APM Terminals wants to sell the semi-automated container terminal it now leases to the Virginia Port Authority.
17 Apr 2014
The Virginia Port Authority’s board underwent its second shakeup in less than three years today when Gov. Terry McAuliffe replaced five of the board’s 11 appointed members, saying he wanted to reverse the port’s financial losses.
16 Apr 2014
The Port of Jacksonville is poised to get the congressional go-ahead to deepen its harbor in order to handle larger container ships, after the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a needed report.
15 Apr 2014
A group representing cruise operators, stevedores and the International Longshoremen’s Association bought full-page newspaper advertisements to criticize soccer star David Beckham’s proposal to build a 25,000-seat stadium at the Port of Miami.

Commentary

The reaction of shippers to West Coast longshore labor disruption is evolving in such a way that West Coast ports have reason for concern.

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