East Coast Ports

In-depth news, analysis and statistical information of U.S. East Coast ports such as the Port of New York and New Jersey and the Port of Savannah. Dockworkers on the U.S. East Coast are represented by the International Longshoremen's Association. East Coast ports have spent the last several years preparing for the opening of the new locks of the Panama Canal, which handled their first commercial transit on June 26, 2016. Industry observers are now watching closely to see if East Coast ports begin to capture a larger share of imports from Asia, which the West Coast has traditionally dominated.

Special Coverage

Several ILA officials threw a surprise curve ball in a pre-negotiation meeting with United States Maritime Alliance, proposing a one-day coastwide work stoppage and Washington march against “government interference” in longshore hiring.

News & Analysis

02 Jun 2017
More drayage companies at the Port of New York and New Jersey are buying their own chassis or signing long-term leases to avoid the difficulty of rental pools.
15 Sep 2016
Billed as the “Mid-American Arc,” the GPA’s rail-focused initiative will allow the port to better serve markets from Atlanta to Memphis, St. Louis, Chicago, and the Ohio Valley.
14 Sep 2016
The first barge to sail in a new cross-harbor service designed to increase productivity in the Port of New York and New Jersey will embark Thursday.
The Hugh K. Leatherman terminal at the Port of Charleston, pictured under construction, will increase the port's overall capacity by 50 percent upon completion.
13 Sep 2016
The Port of Charleston and the state of South Carolina over the next decade will spend a combined $2.2 billion to handle New Panamax ships.
Although traffic at the Port of New York and New Jersey, pictured, declined year-over-year in July, it was still the highest monthly figure to date in 2016.
08 Sep 2016
The volume of loaded containers imported through the Port of New York and New Jersey fell in July for the fifth consecutive month.
03 Sep 2016
Details are emerging on how much US ports and marine terminals are charging shippers to release stranded Hanjin Shipping containers.

Commentary

Will this be a game-changer in terms of port routings?