The Driver Shortage

Truck drivers are the basic unit of transportation capacity and the glue that holds supply chains together. No container or straight truck or trailer moves without, at some point, a truck driver. Even so, trucking companies, especially truckload carriers, often have great difficulty finding, hiring and keeping drivers. Nearly every period of economic growth is accompanied by a driver "shortage," including the recovery that began in 2009.

Is today’s shortage truly a demographic lack of available qualified drivers, or is it a market shortage created by comparatively low pay and unsatisfactory working conditions? How will federal regulations governing licensing, medical testing, safety enforcement and how long drivers may work affect demand and supply? Unless trucking companies, logistics providers and shippers work together to finally resolve trucking’s “driver problem,” transportation and logistics costs will rise substantially, and supply chains will be put at risk.

Read more:

10 Reasons for Driver Turnover and What Carriers Can Do About It

 

News & Analysis

17 Apr 2017
Shippers and logistics operators at recent conferences didn't expect a massive capacity crunch to follow the rollout of an electronic logging mandate this year, but truckers warned there will be an impact.
08 Dec 2016
Truck driver pay is beginning to rise as truckload freight demand picks up.
05 Dec 2016
A drug and alcohol testing clearinghouse could potentially further reduce the pool of available labor in an industry already battling a shortage of drivers.
23 Nov 2016
“It’s hard, but it’s good, solid work,” Knight told an audience at the 2016 JOC Inland Distribution Conference in Memphis earlier this month. “Make that more attractive to anybody and you’ll drag anybody in.”
15 Nov 2016
The American Trucking Associations hopes for a bigger role in crafting 'data-driven' regulations under a Trump administration.
09 Nov 2016
The much-rumored truckload capacity crunch hasn't been canceled but simply postponed for a year or less by low economic growth, speakers at the 2016 JOC Inland Distribution Conference said.

Commentary

The evidence is overwhelming that the younger the driver, the greater the risk of road accidents and fatalities.