Regulation & Policy

Indian trade unions are going ahead with a strike planned for Friday despite government concessions.

Opposition to the shipment of liquid radioactive waste from Canada to South Carolina by truck spotlights broader challenge to hazardous materials transportation.

The electronic logging device mandate could create value for smaller trucking companies by enabling better shipment visibility.
A U.S. federal mandate requiring truck drivers to use electronic logging devices by the end of next year won’t necessarily be the harbinger of a long-anticipated “capacity crunch.”

Shippers and the Directorate of General of Shipping are unhappy with how some container terminals have been handling container weighing to comply with SOLAS.
India’s maritime administrator is showing no sign of backing down from its previous diktat barring container terminal operators from offering container weighing services on-site for a fee.

A proposal to mandate speed-limiting technology on heavy trucks would increase demand for truck drivers, U.S. regulators admit.

The Ocean Alliance will get a new 45-day review period from the U.S. Federal Maritime Commission after it submits responses to FMC queries.
U.S. maritime regulators have more questions for the Ocean Alliance.

Two different parts of the federal government, the Commerce Department and Department of Transportation, are looking into the issue of productivity at U.S. ports.
The U.S. federal government, with the help of shippers and others, is trying to come to grips with how to improve port productivity.

Containers from more than 30 countries and the U.S. that have recorded cases of the Zika virus are now subject to extra scrutiny from Chinese regulators.
Many U.S. exporters are still confused about how to meet Chinese rules aimed at preventing the spread of the Zika virus.

It could be some time before Cuban container cranes, such as these pictured in Havana, start lifting more volumes bound for international markets.
Commercial shipping's opportunities to do business with Cuba are unlikely to significantly improve until at least February 2018.

Shippers say changes to the motor carrier bill of lading have shifted the burden of proof for negligence from motor carriers to shippers.
Two shipper groups are protesting changes to the uniform bill of lading, but does the U.S. Surface Transportation Board have the authority to intervene?