Port News

Under Armour in 2015 rerouted its US shipments through the Port of Baltimore after the difficulties it experienced during the 2014 and 2015 West Coast labor dispute.

Athletic footwear and apparel maker Under Armour’s plan to build a 1.3-million-square-foot e-commerce distribution and warehouse facility is set to boost container traffic through the nearby Port of Baltimore and enhance the larger logistics park it will move goods through.


As vessel alliances change, SPRC of Colombia, pictured, and ports around the world will face new challenges.
The days of multiuser container terminals could be coming to an end, according to the head of a Colombian container terminal.

The refrigerated and tank container-leasing sectors are projected to grow at a faster rate than leasing for dry boxes in 2016.
The container-leasing industry is facing its toughest financial challenge since the downturn of 2009.

First-half profit at Shanghai International Port Group fell as the economic slowdown in China dampened demand for shipping services.

Asian transshipment hubs, such as Port Klang, Malaysia, pictured, must adjust to a landscape of low growth and shifting service networks.
Asia’s transshipment hubs are facing turbulent times.

Khalifa Port, pictured, could eventually be able to handle 15 million twenty-foot-equivalent units annually.
Abu Dhabi’s Khalifa Port is accelerating its expansion of capacity.

An 11-year high tide combined with beach erosion to shut down South America’s busiest port and cast doubt on plans to dredge deeper so the port can handle larger ships.

The South Carolina Ports Authority has ordered 12 rubber-tire gantry cranes for use at Charleston’s Wando Welch terminal.

It took years longer than expected, but CMA CGM is on its way to transforming the container transshipment terminal in Kingston, Jamaica, into a regional powerhouse.

Shippers and the Directorate of General of Shipping are unhappy with how some container terminals have been handling container weighing to comply with SOLAS.
India’s maritime administrator is showing no sign of backing down from its previous diktat barring container terminal operators from offering container weighing services on-site for a fee.