Port News

container stacks in Long Beach
Now that the West Coast’s labor problems are behind them, longshoremen and employers must focus on the real chokepoint in marine terminal operations — the container yard, the president of the largest International Longshore and Warehouse Union local said Thursday.

container ship at Garden City Terminal, Port of Savanah, with reefers onboard
The Port of Savannah is ramping up its refrigerated cargo capacity after substantial year-over-year growth in reefer cargo at the Georgia port.

The Port of Houston’s loaded container volumes jumped 46 percent in April, boosted by cargo diversions from the U.S. West Coast that appear to have had more staying power than some originally anticipated.

Lionel Louie at TPM 2015.

Better data allows for better negotiations.


The Harbor Trucking Association of Southern California has formed its own chassis pool to ensure its member companies will have access to the equipment they need even when terminals in Los Angeles-Long Beach are experiencing equipment shortages or dislocations.

German locomotive drivers on Thursday called off their latest strike —the ninth in 10 months – and agreed to refer their dispute with Deutsche Bahn, the state-owned railway company, to arbitration.

Port of New York and New Jersey, Maher Terminals
Demurrage and per-diem detention fees at gridlocked U.S. ports have turned into a multimillion-dollar hot potato. Cargo interests, truckers, ocean carriers and marine terminals are locked in noisy, seemingly nonstop argument over responsibility for the fees. It’s a complex problem with no easy solution — but plenty of finger-pointing.

Shanghai port
China’s top 20 coastal ports in April began to claw back some of the container volumes lost during the dismal foreign trade recorded in March, even though exports continued to fall in year-over-year comparisons.

U.S. West Coast waterfront employers overwhelmingly voted to ratify a five-year contract with the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, bringing both sides one step closer to healing the wounds inflicted on shippers during months of congestion.

With no clear path to prevent a recurrence of the crippling, nearly yearlong disruption visited upon West Coast ports and, as of this writing, no final ratification of a new contract by West Coast dockworkers, shippers are exercising their right of free choice and walking away.