Port News

Retailers project that U.S. containerized imports from Asia this month will rise only 3.3 percent year-over-year, a further sign that what normally is the busiest month of the annual peak season in the eastbound Pacific will be only a “bump” this year.

Efforts to merge Brazil’s Special Ports Ministry (SEP) with the Ministry of Transport seem to have been put on hold, at least temporarily, with the appointment of Helder Barbalho as the ministry’s new leader.

Nearly a year after labor stoppages at U.S. West Coast ports burned scores of perishables shippers, the industry’s largest advocacy group refuses to relent in its push for greater transparency in how ports are operated and negotiations with unions are conducted.

Kazakhstan Railways, the national railway company of Kazakhstan, will build a 1 million 20-foot-equivalent unit container terminal in Klaipeda, Lithuania, home to one of the largest Baltic seaports.

The government of India this week approved an infrastructure upgrade project at the major public port of Paradip, allowing the country’s second-largest general cargo handler to expand capacity and improve operational efficiency.

The Incheon Port Authority has doubled the size of the ships it can handle in the last decade and is working to handle even larger vessels as it continues to invest in an effort to lower costs for shippers and become a regional hub.

This year’s peak shipping season has come and gone, and with it so has the notion of a traditional peak season, industry executives said at the JOC Inland Distribution Conference here Thursday.

China has begun safety inspections of companies handling dangerous goods in the vicinity of Tianjin Port, the world’s 10th busiest container port, as supply chains adjust to the changes wrought by deadly explosions in August.

Swedish furniture maker IKEA has decided it will make Incheon port its primary South Korean gateway after it began testing out Incheon New Port Phase 1-1 container pier (Terminal B) in July.

Hutchison Ports Australia (HPA) and the Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) today agreed to extend conciliation talks until November as both sides try to find a way out of a bitter dispute that exploded after 97 workers were fired in early August.