Port of Virginia

27 Feb 2017
State port authorities in Georgia and Virginia want US federal maritime regulators to allow them to work together.
22 Jan 2016
After near-unprecedented congestion rocked the Port of Virginia in 2015, the 50-foot-deep port says it’s ready to handle brisk volume growth coming via the larger vessels soon to move through the expanded Panama Canal — and do so efficiently.
13 Jan 2016
The Port of Virginia’s container volume topped 2.5 million 20-foot-equivalent units for the first time as its terminals posted a 6.5 percent increase in TEUs during 2015, despite a decline in December volume.
10 Dec 2015
Though a muted peak season drew down cargo volumes last month, the Port of Virginia remains on track to complete a record-setting 2015, according to officials.
03 Dec 2015
The Port of Virginia’s chassis pool will implement a new system allowing beneficial cargo owners to be billed directly for chassis fees, and taking truckers and ocean carriers out of the middle of the billing process.
Russell Held at JOC Inland 2015
22 Nov 2015
Port of Virginia's Russell Held on its short-haul inland network, rail connections and the Panama Canal expansion.
12 Nov 2015
The Port of Virginia handled 233,466 twenty-foot-equivalent units of full and empty containers in October, making it the port’s single busiest month ever and the eighth straight with volume above 200,000 TEUs.
21 Sep 2015
The Virginia Port Authority will continue to operate the Port of Richmond after the city awarded the VPA a 40-year concession of the inland port on the James River.
18 Sep 2015
In a move that will be temporarily disruptive but is aimed at addressing the port's truck bottleneck, the Port of Virginia will close a chassis yard next week
South Carolina inland port at Greer
16 Sep 2015
astman Chemical is avoiding hundreds of 300-mile round truck trips a month to the Port of Charleston by loading them at the inland port in Greer, South Carolina.
trucks line up at gates at Oakland port
25 Aug 2015
The Port of Oakland’s announcement last week that it intends to open its terminal gates an extra day each week demonstrates two hard, cold facts about U.S. port operations in this era of big ships. The traditional menu of five weekday gates each week is no longer adequate to handle today’s cargo volumes, but extra gates cost money, and someone — often the shipper — has to pick up the tab.