Port of New York and New Jersey

The Port of New York and New Jersey is the busiest container port on the East Coast of the United States and is where containerization first began with the sailing of the Ideal X in 1956. Its terminals are located throughout the New York metropolitan area including Brooklyn, New York, and Newark, New Jersey. The largest terminal in the port is operated by Maher Terminals.

18 May 2017
“We’re angry that the port authority is acting like a real estate broker instead of trying to help the industry.”
17 May 2017
New York-New Jersey port officials and the major container lines are trying again to convince US federal maritime regulators to allow them to discuss a contentious per-container charge.
15 May 2017
Recommendations highlight the unique requirements of mega-ships and the complexity of bringing them to berth.
03 May 2017
TRAC, Flexi-Van, and DCLI now operate competing pools that don’t share equipment.
02 May 2017
The completion of the $1.6 billion elevation project will enable big ships at the nation’s third-largest port to reach three of its four main terminals.
25 Apr 2017
Authorities on Tuesday removed the height restriction on certain ships going under the Bayonne Bridge in the Port of New York and New Jersey.
21 Apr 2017
For the first time, Savannah has more weekly trans-Pacific alliance services than the Port of New York and New Jersey.
18 Apr 2017
Terminals at the Port of New York and New Jersey will mark Earth Day by using low emissions yard tractors and cargo-handling equipment.
13 Apr 2017
The operator of the Port of New York and New Jersey’s first ever terminal gate appointment program is expanding the 4-month-old pilot initiative.
20 Mar 2017
New York may be the city that never sleeps, but the four main terminals at its namesake port, the Port of New York and New Jersey, are closed by 7 p.m.
14 Mar 2017
The Port of NY-NJ is opening first thing Wednesday after it took a smaller than expected storm pummeling
06 Mar 2017
A federal judge on Friday gave the go-ahead to Maher Terminals at the Port of New York and New Jersey and the Georgia Ports Authority to dispose of Hanjin Shipping containers.