NCBFAA WAS PLEASED WITH KELLY'S REMARKS

The report concerning Customs Commissioner Ray Kelly (''Brokers say Kelly comes up short,'' March 10, Page 1A) grossly misrepresented and distorted the feelings of the majority of brokers and forwarders present at the National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association annual conference.

To the contrary of what was stated in the article, NCBFFA members were pleased with Commissioner Kelly's remarks. The commissioner highlighted the importance of providing the proper resourcing and attention to the commercial environment, an emphasis the brokers wanted to hear. We recognize the enforcement and commercial operations are not mutually exclusive and were pleased to have this focus in his remarks.Additionally, the commissioner announced the expansion of his outreach to our community - through his own availability and through the appointment of a Customs ombudsman with whom he'll meet every single day. That commitment exceeded our expectations.

In sum, the report that brokers and forwarders were unhappy with the commissioner's presentation is untrue. It was poorly reported, unprofessionally written and unfortunately cast the commissioner in a bad light. NCBFAA has apologized to the commissioner and believes that The Journal of Commerce must do so also.

Peter Powell

President

National Customs Brokers and Forwarders Association of America

The Journal of Commerce reported that several customs brokers attending the NCBFAA conference were concerned at and critical of Customs' direction under Commissioner Kelly. The article did not purport to represent these as the official views of the NCBFFA. The Journal of Commerce stands by its reporting.

BROKER SUPPORTS EFFORTS

OF U.S. CUSTOMS SERVICE

In reference to the Page 1 article concerning U.S. Customs (Brokers say Kelly comes up short,'' March 10) in which I am quoted:

I in no way meant to imply that other services suffer when there is an emphasis on enforcement. That was not the spirit of my comment.

My record, in more than 40 years of involvement in this industry, has and will continue to be one of the utmost support for the efforts of U.S. Customs. I sincerely regret any impression otherwise.

Stewart B. Hauser

New York

NO US NUCLEAR MATERIAL

WENT TO INDIAN AGENCY

The report headlined ''Loophole lets nuke materials into India'' (Feb. 18, Page 1A) made allegations about the export of nuclear materials including tritium from the United States to India. These allegations are completely baseless.

There has been no export from the United States of any nuclear material, including tritium, to the Department of Atomic Energy in India. India's nuclear program is an excellent example of indigenization and the allegations appear to be motivated by a desire to tarnish this remarkable achievement.

Navtej Sarna

Counsellor Embassy of India

Washington

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