Hanjin Shipping

Hanjin Shipping is the world’s seventh-largest container shipping company worldwide and number one in Korea, with a fleet of 98 container vessels. Founded in South Korea in 1949, Hanjin is present in 60 countries with approximately 6,000 employees. Hanjin will join THE Alliance when that vessel-sharing agreement enters force in 2017.

31 May 2017
The New York Stock Exchange-listed group’s net income tumbled.
22 Mar 2017
A federal judge has allowed a bank to foreclose on and sell its interest in more than 1,500 Hanjin Shipping containers to repay the bank for owed lease payments.
17 Mar 2017
The lessons to be learned from the collapse of Hanjin Shipping are almost too many to absorb.
17 Feb 2017
The legal salvo is the latest sign of how Hanjin containers continue to disrupt the global container shipping market.
14 Feb 2017
Aside from Hanjin Shipping, the Hanjin Group has a controlling share of Korean Air Lines, and its subsidiaries range from various logistics companies to universities.
14 Feb 2017
Signs of a container shortage are emerging with leasing companies reluctant to place orders for new containers until they get their Hanjin leased boxes back, and up to 40 percent of those units have yet to be recovered.
30 Jan 2017
A pension fund for longshoremen at the Port of New York and New Jersey want permission from a bankruptcy court to seek companies related to the carrier who can help pay the debt.
30 Jan 2017
More than two-thirds of failed Hanjin Shipping’s fleet is still looking for employment.
18 Jan 2017
A New Jersey judge allows Hanjin Shipping to sell its share of a company that operates terminals in Seattle and Long Beach
14 Jan 2017
Creditors worried they won’t be properly compensated with the sale proceeds.
06 Jan 2017
Port of Seattle wants MSC to post a bond guarantee before being allowed to purchase Terminal 46.
04 Jan 2017
The trans-Pacific is one of the world’s most competitive container trades, with at least six container lines over the last six years having entered the trade lane only to pull out later.