International Trade News

Merchandise trade between Japan and the United States is expanding at a breakneck pace, as Japan’s exports and imports both charged ahead by more than 20 percent for the second straight month in April on a year-on-year basis.

High-tech companies around the world expect exports to grow over the next two years, but air cargo freight and passenger jets are set to gain not container lines.

Mexican exports this year are set rise 5 percent on increased demand for automobile shipments and other manufactured goods built in Latin America’s second-largest economy.

Germany, the Netherlands and Belgium are the biggest beneficiaries of increased U.S. demand for European goods and materials, according to PIERS, a sister product of JOC.com within IHS Martime & Trade.

More high-tech companies across the globe are moving their operations back to, or near, the location of demand for their products, building more flexibility into their supply chains, according to a new study published by UPS.

Palletways, one of several groups offering shippers a palletized freight network in Europe, says it plans eastward expansion as cross-border volume within its network grows.

Footwear importers are doing more business in Southeast Asia than ever before, and imports from that region will grow even faster if the U.S. approves the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement.

C.H. Robinson Worldwide is priming its $330 million Global Forwarding division for faster growth in 2015, naming Mike Short president and opening new offices in Asia and Europe.

Sluggish demand and unfavorable exchange rates are driving down U.S. containerized exports to Africa and having the reverse effect on American imports from the continent.

The number of tractor-trailers crossing U.S. borders rose 2.4 percent in the first quarter, following a 4 percent increase last year, according to Department of Transportation data. Border crossings between the U.S. and Mexico outpaced U.S.-Canadian truck traffic.