Air Cargo

Fresh from a dismal third quarter, freight forwarding and logistics provider Damco is expanding its multimodal presence in China’s electronics manufacturing hub of Zhengzhou.

Asia’s competitive airline environment is placing intense profitability pressure on carriers in the region, but the focus on costs will not see air cargo shippers facing the wide scale route cutbacks, reduced frequencies and rolled shipments that have afflicted their ocean freight counterparts.

Air cargo is going through a period of adjustment that will keep profitability largely out of reach for the world’s carriers until more of a balance is achieved between cargo capacity and demand.

Cargolux, Europe’s largest all-cargo carrier, posted its best ever October, with its fleet of 22 Boeing 747 freighters breaking records for tonnage, revenue and block hours.

European Union regulators approved Etihad Airways' acquisition of a 49 percent stake in loss-making Italian-flag carrier Alitalia.

The strong rebound of trans-Pacific trade will ensure the air cargo industry enjoys a happy festive season this year, but few are prepared to forecast the robust growth will continue much past Chinese New Year.

The chaotic waterfront scenes jamming up U.S. gateway ports on the West Coast are proving a boon for the air charter business and with no end in sight to the congestion, forwarders are securing space on chartered freighters for urgent cargo.

The third quarter was good to practically all the publicly owned U.S. trucking companies: none reported losses, and their combined revenue rose 10.7 percent to more than $10 billion, supported by a second quarter of stronger freight demand and economic growth.

Road and city drivers at a FedEx Freight terminal in Newark, N.J., voted against joining the Teamsters union — the second victory for FedEx Freight in four elections.

Shippers of trans-Pacific ocean freight trying to avoid crippling West Coast port congestion are turning to air cargo in such numbers that forwarders report prices going “through the roof.”